History for All the People: 100 Years of Public History in North Carolina

By Mulligan, William H., Jr. | South Carolina Historical Magazine, July 2006 | Go to article overview

History for All the People: 100 Years of Public History in North Carolina


Mulligan, William H., Jr., South Carolina Historical Magazine


History for All the People: 100 Years of Public History in North Carolina. By Ansley Herring Wegner. (Raleigh: Office of Archives and History, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, 2003.Pp.118;$14.70, paper.)

Anniversary and commemorative histories are a significant part of public history because anniversaries galvanize the attention of the public, and histories, or historical narratives, fill some of the needs that attention demands. Anniversaries are a time to reflect on what has happened and to celebrate accomplishments, to be sure. They are also a time to reflect on how the subject has dealt with the challenges it faced during its history. The best of these anniversary histories are as reflective as they are celebratory.

History for All the People, an anniversary history of the work of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History, is both timely and appropriate. It is also reflective and balanced. It celebrates that which merits celebration without passing over those instances where another course might have been followed had individuals taken a broader view or society a different outlook. That ability to be critical in the larger scholarly sense of assessing the history of the agency and the contributions of individuals is one of the great strengths and attractions of the book. Hence, in addition to recording the history of an important state public-history program, History for All the People helps begin a much-needed analysis and critique of what has been done, and is being done, in the field of public history. In much of public history, there is limited opportunity for peer review prior to implementation of a program, installation of an exhibit, etcetera. The profession needs a forum for critical discourse. This is beginning with the publication of reviews of exhibits and programs and other public-history projects. Ashley Herring Wegner and all of those involved in this book have made a real contribution on several levels to this emerging discourse and deserve the thanks of the profession for a job well done. This book is a sound model for future books to follow.

The history of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History is not remarkable, really. There are many similar stories across the country. Even more reason, I think, to study what happened with public history in North Carolina and try to understand it. People are important in developing public-history programs and agencies. Starting new programs that depend on public funding is not for the shy or faint of heart. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

History for All the People: 100 Years of Public History in North Carolina
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.