Birdhouse Speakers

By Whiteley, Peter O. | Sunset, July 2002 | Go to article overview

Birdhouse Speakers


Whiteley, Peter O., Sunset


Build a rustic wood shell to disguise an outdoor speaker

You're more likely to hear Mozart or Dave Matthews than chirping emanating from this birdhouse. That's because it hides an outdoor speaker, giving new meaning to the audio-electronics term "tweeter." Our tweeter can mount to a wall, sit atop a pole, or even hang from a sturdy branch, depending on wiring needs. It's open at the bottom, so the speaker faces downward. The size and shape of the speakers you select determine the interior volume of the birdhouse shell. We bought a speaker that measures approximately 6 inches wide, 10 inches high, and 7 inches deep.

COST: $10 per shell, not including speakers

TIME: About 3 hours

MATERIALS

* Speaker

* One 6-foot-long rough-sawn redwood 1-by-12

* Glue

* 5/8-inch (depending on plywood thickness) brads

* One 4-inch square of 1/4-inch plywood

* 2 1/2-inch galvanized finish nails

* 1 1/2-inch deck screws

* Speaker wire

* Paint or wood stain (optional)

* Mounting hardware (see step 9 for options)

TOOLS

Tape measure, yardstick, protractor, circular or table saw, electric drill, C-clamp, hammer, nailset, and carpenter's square.

DIRECTIONS

1. Measure your speaker and calculate interior dimensions to be about 1/2 inch larger in all widths and lengths. The height of the shell can be several inches more than the depth of the speaker. Plan to make butt joints at corners; experienced woodworkers could make mitered joints. For a more professional finish, you could make an angled cut on the two ends to match the pitch of the roof.

2. Lay out and cut pieces of redwood for the sides. Drill a 3/4-inch hole near the pea of what will be the front of the house, ther glue and tack with brads the plywood square over the hole on the inside face. …

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