Paella Party

By Anusasananan, Linda Lau; Schneider, Sara | Sunset, July 2002 | Go to article overview

Paella Party


Anusasananan, Linda Lau, Schneider, Sara, Sunset


Make an authentic Valencian paella on the barbecue or a quick version on the stove. Take your pick for a lively midsummer meal

* Paella has transcended Spanish borders and earned international fame primarily as an extravagant, saffron-- scented rice and seafood dish cooked in a wide, flat pan. But in its native home of Valencia, paella comes in many forms, from rustic versions based on products from the land to showy variations using the bounty of the sea.

David Llodra grew up eating paella in Alboraya, a small town north of Valencia in a rice-growing region near Albufera Lake. His grandmother made a traditional country-style version, with chicken, rabbit, and beans, over a fire fueled with wood from orange trees. One day, however, having broken her arm, she was unable to cook. Llodra's craving prompted initiative: "Just tell me what to do, and I'll make it," he pleaded. And a new paella master was born.

Llodra himself has emigrated from Spain and now lives in Sonoma, California, with his wife, Katherine, and 1-year-old daughter, Eden. Here, he has adapted his authentic paella to American ingredients and equipment-- charcoal briquets instead of felled and split orange trees, for instance. The natural cycle of a charcoal fire in a kettle barbecue matches the stages of cooking paella: browning the chicken, simmering the broth, and cooking the rice. The even heat also produces a delicious brown crust on the bottom, called socarrat, a highly prized delicacy in a well-made paella. The pans themselves are now easy to find here (see page 138). California medium-grain rice works just as well as more expensive imported Spanish rice. And, in what also seems like a departure but really isn't, Llodra rarely uses expensive saffron. Most Spaniards, he says, actually use a product called colorante, which gives the rice a yellow tinge; we find turmeric a suitable alternative.

Paella cooked as Llodra does it, on the barbecue, makes for a leisurely outdoor party. Prepare all the ingredients beforehand, then cook the paella while guests nibble on tapas and watch the proceedings. If you are uncomfortable with an audience in the yard, however, or want a lighter, contemporary seafood paella, choose our simplified stovetop version on page 138. Either dish makes a great party centerpiece.

Chicken Paella Valenciana from the Barbecue

Simple Seafood and Sausage Paella

[Sidebar]

Menu: Paella choices

[Sidebar]

The barbecued paella below and the seafood version on page 138 feed five or six people as a main course. …

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