Industry Activities

American Cinematographer, January 1982 | Go to article overview

Industry Activities


UCLA EXTENSION HOSTS CONFERENCE ON PRODUCING MOVIES FOR TELEVISION: NETWORK AND CABLE

UCLA Extension will present "Producing Movies for Television: Network and Cable," the seventh in a series of independent motion picture production conferences, Saturday, February 6, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Century Plaza Hotel, Los Angeles.

Joan Barnett, vice president, Motion Pictures for Television, NBC Studios, will be the special guest speaker.

Topics and speakers include "Business and Legal Aspects: Packaging, Acquisition of Rights, Sources of Revenues, Current Securities and Tax Aspects," David Comsky, attorney, Freshman, Mulvaney, Marantz, Comsky, Forst, Kahan and Deutsch, Beverly Hills; "The Making of the Film" Buck Houghton, writer/ producer; and "Business Affairs Aspects: The Production Point of View," Sid Kalcheim, vice president in charge of Business Affairs, Columbia Pictures Television.

Others include "Network Programming Practices," Alien Sabinson, vice president, Program Administration, NBC Studios; "Sales, Publicity and Promotion Aspects," George Gaber, Director of Communications, Viacom; "Cable and Pay Television Aspects," Jane Deknatel, Home Box Office; and "Packaging," Robert L. Graham, agent, Creative Artists Agency, Inc. David Comsky is program coordinator.

The $145 fee includes luncheon, coffee break and handout materials.

For additional information call the Department of Business and Management, UCLA Extension at (213) 825-7031.

AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL NOW ACCEPTING ENTRIES FOR 1982 COMPETITION

DATES. The Educational Film Library Association is now accepting entries for its 24th annual American Film Festival, to be held June 14-19 at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. Deadline for accepting entry forms is January 15, 1982. The American Film Festival is the major event of the non-theatrical film field, and an important showcase for 16mm films and videotapes for use in libraries, schools, museums, and other community programs.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS. Only 16mm optical track films and ¾'' video cassettes released for general distribution in the United States between January 1980 and December 1981, are eligible for competition. Details of competition regulations and official entry forms may be obtained from the American Film Festival, 43 West 61 Street, New York, N.Y. 10023. Telephone (212) 246-4533.

CATEGORIES. The 1982 Festival will include over 60 categories covering the diverse areas of Art and Culture, Education and Information, Mental Health and Guidance, and Contemporary Concerns. Documentaries of 50-110 minutes may be entered in one of several "Feature-length Documentary" categories. There will also be special competitions for Business and Industry, Health and Safety, Elementary/ Junior High Instructional Films and Video.

AWARDS. A Blue Ribbon will be awarded to the highest rated film or video production in each category. Runners-up receive a Red Ribbon. The prestigious EMILY award goes to the film which receives the highest rating of all of the winners. The JOHN GRIERSON award is a cash prize, presented annually to a new filmmaker who shows outstanding talent in the social documentary field. Awards will be presented at a special ceremony on Friday, June 18.

FESTIVAL CIRCUITS. Following the 24th annual American Film Festival, the Blue and Red Ribbon winners will be circulated to EFLA-member institutions throughout the country, where the films/ tapes will be showcased in free public screenings in major libraries, schools, and universities. …

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