Accredited Law Enforcement Programs

By Gavigan, Jennifer | Law & Order, June 2007 | Go to article overview

Accredited Law Enforcement Programs


Gavigan, Jennifer, Law & Order


A degree in Criminal Justice prepares students to establish or advance their careers in the law enforcement community at one of the most important times in our nation's history. Defending our nation against terrorist activities has added a new and important facet to the job. Positions in patrol, crime investigation, criminal and terrorist profiling, civilian intelligence operations, communications operations, cyber-crime and other technological applications are added within LE agencies on a regular basis.

Many colleges and universities now offer accredited law enforcement programs to students all over the world. Distance learning is a convenient way for today's busy LE professionals to earn undergraduate and graduate degrees over the Internet. Associate, bachelor's and master's degrees are available in Criminal Justice, Homeland security, Forensics and more. The following is a look at just some of the programs offered by schools across the country.

American Public University System

The American Public University System's (APUS) emphasis is on working adults serving in the public safety and national security sectors and beyond. Within the APUS is the American Military University, located everywhere there is Internet access. Professors work from around the world, where many hold teaching positions at other universities or are active professionals at the National Security Agency, United Nations, U.S. military, among others. Students can earn B.A. and M.A. degrees in Criminal Justice and Homeland Security.

The Criminal Justice programs prepare students for a career in law enforcement or corrections. The degree program provides students with knowledge in the following areas: Criminal Justice Administration and Organization; Criminal Justice Theories and Concepts; Criminal Justice Operations, Practices, and Processes. American Military University's Homeland Security programs teach four key disciplines critical to the protection of our critical infrastructure: Emergency & Disaster Management, Intelligence Analysis & Operations, Criminal Justice & Security, Transportation & Logistics.

www.apus.edu

www.amu.apus.edu/index.htm

Bellevue University

To support student demand and flexibility in completing degrees, Bellevue University now offers courses and programs online and in several locations in Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota. The Criminal Justice Administration (C.J.A.) program is offered in the accelerated, cohort-based format, designed for people working in, or closely associated with, the criminal justice system. It presents a focused set of managerial techniques, theories and methods for the professional in that field.

Some of the classes required for a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice include: Ethics, Policy, and Administrative Law in Criminal Justice; Personnel and Equipment Allocations in Criminal Justice Agencies; Tactical Operations Management in Criminal Justice Organizations; Community Policing. A Bachelor of Science in Corrections Administration and Management is also available at Bellevue and includes courses on: History and Philosophy of Corrections; Resource Allocation in Corrections: Equipment, Facilities, and Personnel; Information Systems in Corrections; Restorative Justice and the Community.

www.bellevue.edu/degrees/cja.asp

www.bellevue.edu/degrees/cac.asp

California University of Pennsylvania

California University of Pennsylvania is 35 miles from downtown Pittsburgh. The philosophy of education for the Department of Justice, Law & Society at Cal U is to integrate the substantive, procedural, theoretical, and scientific aspects of law, crime, justice, anthropology and sociology with a liberal arts education while incorporating ethics, leadership and diversity.

Led by a team of scholars and professionals with extensive real-world experience, the Justice Studies Program in the Department of Justice, Law & Society is designed for highly motivated students who seek leadership positions in the various criminal justice professions or further studies in law or graduate school. …

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