Louisiana Says Thank You

By Dewey-Kollen, Janet | Law & Order, November 2005 | Go to article overview

Louisiana Says Thank You


Dewey-Kollen, Janet, Law & Order


Even as Hurricanes Katrina and Rita dealt devastating blows to Louisiana and the Gulf Coast Region, America's law enforcement and emergency response communities mobilized to assist with additional manpower, resources, and expertise. Once again, in a time of need, friends and colleagues responded with help and support.

Colonel Henry L. Whitehorn, Superintendent of the Louisiana State Police, summed up the appreciation of state officials and the public when he said, "Upon receiving the first reports of massive destruction, we mobilized hundreds of Louisiana State Police troopers to New Orleans and other areas in southeast Louisiana. Unfortunately, all available resources were consumed quickly by the residents' overwhelming need. Law enforcement agencies across America enthusiastically responded with officers who displayed professionalism and compassion. The state of Louisiana is indebted to all of the law enforcement agencies that responded to our call for assistance."

Many state agencies participated in the recovery effort, including the Arkansas State Police, California Highway Patrol, Georgia State Patrol, Illinois State Police, Kentucky State Police, Michigan State Police, New Jersey State Police, New Mexico State Police, and New York State Police.

In addition, many local agencies (from the large, New York Police Department, to small Jenny Lind Police Department, CA) answered the call from their state police organizations. For example, the entire contingent from Illinois consisted of personnel from 64 police departments and municipal departments in addition to the State Police. New Jersey and Michigan also had a large task force in addition to the troopers. Federal agencies assisted, too. These agencies include FBI, Customs and Border Protection, Federal Protective Service, and Federal Air Marshal Service.

Specific missions conducted by the various responding agencies included providing a law enforcement presence for FEMA during body recovery, transporting pharmaceutical supplies into affected areas, search and rescue, responding to homes to clear emergency calls, assisting state and local enforcemnet agencies with patrol duties, staffing traffic checkpoints, escorting necessary supplies into affected areas, and providing security at shelters. …

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