Repertory Jazz Review: Living Performances of Music History

By Reny, Bob | IAJRC Journal, May 2007 | Go to article overview

Repertory Jazz Review: Living Performances of Music History


Reny, Bob, IAJRC Journal


Repertory Jazz Review

Living Performances of Music History

By Bob Reny

The Artie Shaw Orchestra A Modern Band in Shaw's Clothing Blues Alley Jazz Club, Washington DC March 19, 2007

The Artie Shaw Orchestra led by veteran swing-bop clarinetist Dick Johnson, roared into Blues Alley in one of its rare DC appearances and gave a full house its money's worth of big band jazz.

While Johnson plays a number of Shaw's arrangements, he also includes other material and the solos are bright and modern. Personnel are an appealing mixture of experienced and young musicians. Case in point: Johnson has over fifty years of involvement with big bands while the authorized Orchestra's pianist, Tom McEvoy, just twenty-six, is a recent but invaluable addition to the mix. Curiously, no vocalist was used on this club date, but one is usually added for dance engagements.

Johnson exudes leadership. Sporting a mane of silver hair like some benign lion, he moves gently around the bandstand, pointing at performers, punching out gestures of approval and identifying each soloist. The musicians, particularly the younger ones, shine when recognized. From their facial expressions, they're obviously having a ball playing this kind of jazz under Johnson's direction. And this joy spills out over the room, giving the music more emotional impact on the listeners.

This orchestra is saucy but disciplined with the kind of tight, ringing section work that marked the best of Shaw's bands. Its arrangements are exciting of course, leaving lots of room for the talented soloists to blow. And Dick Johnson's clarinet playing, whether swinging or bopping, remains impressive. It's an unforgettable band to see and hear, with appeal across the age spectrum as reflected by Monday's diverse audience.

The band opened with Shaw's shrieking, haunting theme, Nightmare, which closed on a number apropos the gig being in the nation's capital, America the Beautiful. And there was much variety of selections in between. Of course distinctly Shavian delights were there, including Softly As In A Morning Sunrise, Moonglow, The Carioca, Begin The Beguine, Concerto For Clarinet, and Frenesi. These were the original charts by Jerry Gray, Lennie Heyton and Artie himself, but with the modern flexibility of interpretation that Shaw recognized would be necessary when he crowned Johnson to take the band back on the road. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Repertory Jazz Review: Living Performances of Music History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.