Kodak Honors "Best Cinematography" Nominees

By Williams, Allan L | American Cinematographer, May 1981 | Go to article overview

Kodak Honors "Best Cinematography" Nominees


Williams, Allan L, American Cinematographer


The century-old company that provides most of the film for Hollywood production pays tribute to the men behind the camera up for Oscars

For the fifth consecutive year Eastman Kodak Company recognized the achievements of the cinematographers nominated for Oscars with a preAcademy Awards banquet honoring the contenders. The affair took place on the evening of March 28 at the Westwood Marquis Hotel in Westwood Village, California.

These occasions provide an opportunity for us to present our own awards recognizing the excellence of the work done by the nominees. They also provide a forum for us to draw attention to the increasingly important role that all cinematographers play in the making of highquality theatrical films. When they received their awards from us prior to the naming of the recipient of the 53rd Academy Award for cinematography, the nominees represented all of their peers in what is indeed becoming a global community of international entertainment filmmakers.

That much becomes obvious when you consider the six nominees and the five motion pictures they helped to create. Geoffrey Unsworth, BSC, and Ghislain Cloquet, ASC, were joint nominees for the filming of TESS. Unsworth, a former Academy Award winner for CABARET started TESS. He died before the picture was completed. We were grateful that his young daughter, Jaqueline, was able to accept our award in his behalf. Unsworth was a native of England.

Cloquet, who was born in Belgium, had the very difficult task of completing TESS. Although he had never met Unsworth or seen him work, Cloquet matched the look and style that was established for TESS so perfectly that it is impossible for anyone who wasn't there to determine which man filmed which scenes. Cloquet has lived in France since 1946, and the main body of his work has been achieved there. TESS was mainly photographed in France with some work done in England.

THE BLUE LAGOON earned Nestor Almendros his third consecutive Academy Award nomination. He won in 1978 for DAYS OF HEAVEN and was nominated last year for KRAMER VS KRAMER. Almendros was born in Spain, and he spent his early years there and in Cuba. Most of his earlier work was done with François Truffaut in France, where he now makes his home. THE BLUE LAGOON was filmed in the Fiji Islands.

Ralf Bode studied acting and directing at the Yale Drama School and was putting in time off-Broadway in New York when he was drafted into the U.S. Army. He was trained as a combat photographer, where he got his first experience with a camera. Later he worked in New York as a gaffer before moving behind the camera. Bode resides in New York. COAL MINER'S DAUGHTER was primarily filmed on location in Tennessee.

James Crabe, ASC, grew up in Hollywood, where his father worked as an artist for Walt Disney and at other studios. Crabe got his start in television at the age of 17 when he shot 16mm inserts for YOU ASKED FOR IT. He still lives in Los Angeles. THE FORMULA was primarily produced in Germany with some scenes filmed in Los Angeles.

Michael Chapman grew up in New England, and started his filmmaking career in New York City, where his credits included THE LAST DETAIL and TAXI DRIVER. He moved to Los Angeles in 1976 because he felt that would provide a broader choice of films to work on. RAGING BULL was filmed in Los Angeles.

There you have it. The six nominees were born in Belgium, Spain, England and on the East and West Coasts of the United States. They currently reside in France, New York and Los Angeles. The films that they were nominated for were originated in France, the Fiji Islands, Tennessee, Los Angeles and Germany.

The global community of filmmakers is in part a reflection of the times. Audiences around the world have become very visually sophisticated, and they are quick to recognize and appreciate big-screen reality.

There is also increasing competition for the time and disposable dollars of theater-going public. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Kodak Honors "Best Cinematography" Nominees
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.