Teaching Languages from a Distance through Multipoint Videoconferencing

By Acar, Ahmet | Foreign Language Annals, Summer 2007 | Go to article overview

Teaching Languages from a Distance through Multipoint Videoconferencing


Acar, Ahmet, Foreign Language Annals


Abstract:

The most commonly used and discussed videoconferencing mode for teaching languages from a distance is two-way simultaneous, or point-to-point, videoconferencing. Applications of multipoint videoconferencing to language classes, however, are not very common. This article aims to fill that gap by presenting the technical and pedagogical dimensions of a pilot project in teaching an introductory course in Turkish (102) via multipoint videoconferencing, which was conducted among students at Syracuse University, Cornell University, and Colgate University. This study shows how multipoint videoconferencing works for language classes and gives some pedagogical pointers to language instructors who plan to use such a system for the first time.

Key words: distance learning, multipoint videoconferencing, room-based videoconferencing, technology for multipoint videoconferencing

Language: Relevant to all languages

Introduction

The development of technology has dispensed with the obstacles of distance in communication among people. The dazzling improvement of technology has reached a stage where it is now possible for people to see each other while communicating from a distance. Due to the application of such technology to language classes, teaching languages at a distance in real time is now gaining wide recognition. While at first, distance teaching was commonly used between two sites or two schools-a procedure called point-to-point videoconferencing-it is now possible to teach languages at a distance to more than two sites. A language instructor can teach a language from a school in the United States, for example, to students at schools in France, Germany, Turkey, and Italy via multipoint videoconferencing technology. While some reports of the applications of point-to-point videoconferencing are already available in the literature (e.g., Katz, 2001; Kinginger, 1998), this article aims to explain the use of multipoint videoconference systems in language classes, including specifics such as their technological and pedagogical dimensions, participants and their roles, out-of-class activities, and classroom activities.

Technological Dimension

Videoconferencing is the use of communication technologies to allow two or more people in different locations to see and hear one another in full motion video.1

Videoconferencing systems vary from room-based to desktop-based videoconferencing, which may employ different kinds of software. For language classes, which require interaction among groups of learners, room-based videoconferencing works better and this is what we used in our multipoint videoconferencing project. There was a large screen in the technology room at each site (Syracuse, Cornell, and Colgate Universities) where the participants could view and communicate with each other. We used the CUsee-me software2 originally developed by Cornell University.

In distance learning technology, there are two videoconferencing modes: point-to-point and multipoint. A videoconference between two sites is called point-to-point; when more than two sites are involved it is called a multipoint videoconference. The technology for the latter requires additional equipment for its implementation.

A videoconference unit consists mainly of a monitor, microphone, video camera, speaker, and coder-decoder (CODEC). Through the use of CODEC, the audio-video signal is converted to digital data, which are compressed so that they can be sent efficiently to the other site over a digital line. CODEC also decompresses and decodes the received signals so that the receiving site can view them. A multipoint unit requires an additional component called multiple conference unit (MCU, also called a bridge), which allows three or more sites to connect to one another.

All videoconferencing systems work by encoding and decoding sound and video signals in both directions simultaneously. The signal can be sent in mainly two ways; schools can connect to each other via the following two networks:

1. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teaching Languages from a Distance through Multipoint Videoconferencing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.