God's Indwelling Presence: The Holy Spirit in the Old & New Testaments

By Burk, Denny | Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, June 2007 | Go to article overview

God's Indwelling Presence: The Holy Spirit in the Old & New Testaments


Burk, Denny, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society


God's Indwelling Presence: The Holy Spirit in the Old & New Testaments. NAC Studies in Bible & Theology. By James M. Hamilton, Jr. Nashville: B & H Academic, 2006, 233 pp., $19.99.

The Gospel according to John has the reputation of being the "spiritual Gospel" within the fourfold Gospel tradition. Its distinct characteristics have caused it to be one of the most beloved books in the Christian canon. Indeed, one recent commentator has said that John's Gospel "penetrates more deeply into the mystery of God's revelation in his Son than the other canonical Gospels and perhaps more deeply than any other biblical book" (Andreas J. Kostenberger, John [BECNT; Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004] 1). The affection that many Christians have for this Gospel is perhaps matched only by the controversy that has surrounded its interpretation. Yet James Hamilton sounds a clear voice among the din of conflicting opinions in his new book God's Indwelling Presence: The Holy Spirit in the Old & New Testaments. This book is the first volume of a new series on biblical theology published by B and H Academic (formerly Broadman and Holman) entitled NAC [New American Commentary] Studies in Bible & Theology. A second recently published volume is Thomas R. Schreiner and Shawn D. Wright, eds., Believer's Baptism: Sign of the New Covenant in Christ.

In God's Indwelling Presence, Hamilton sets out to answer the question of what the Bible says about how the Spirit relates to believers before and after the glorification of Jesus. He takes John 14:17 ("He is with you, and he will be in you") to be John's summary of the Bible's teaching on indwelling as it relates to believers under the old and new covenants. Under the old covenant, God dwelled with his people in a pillar of fire and cloud, in the tabernacle, and in the temple. Under the new covenant, God dwells in a new temple, the community of believers conceived both corporately and individually (p. 3).

Having introduced his thesis in the opening chapter, Hamilton devotes the second chapter to outlining the range of opinions on the question of the Spirit's indwelling presence under the old and new covenants. Chapter 3 surveys the OT and shows that the Holy Spirit did not indwell believers of the old covenant remnant; rather, God dwelled with his people in the tabernacle and the temple. Chapter 4 surveys and explains all the references to the Spirit in John's Gospel and concludes that the Spirit-Paraclete promised in the Farewell Discourse is delivered to the disciples on resurrection day in order to continue the ministry of Jesus. The fifth chapter considers John 7:39 in light of OT expectations in order to show that John presents the reception of the indwelling Spirit by believers as an eschatological blessing experienced only after the glorification of Jesus. Hamilton argues in chapter 6 that regeneration (or "being born again") and indwelling are distinct ministries of the Spirit according to John's Gospel; specifically, indwelling refers to God's eschatological presence within individual believers after the glorification of Jesus. Chapter 7 gives some practical implications resulting from Hamilton's thesis with a particular emphasis on how the Spirit's indwelling presence compels both formative and corrective discipleship within the church.

What stands out about God's Indwelling Presence is that it is truly a work of biblical theology even though it is focused on the Fourth Gospel. One of Hamilton's goals is to show that taking John on his own terms means realizing that John was a biblical theologian himself. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

God's Indwelling Presence: The Holy Spirit in the Old & New Testaments
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.