Sixth Annual Emmy Awards Creative Arts in Television

American Cinematographer, November 1980 | Go to article overview

Sixth Annual Emmy Awards Creative Arts in Television


The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences pays tribute to the creative artists "who utilize their special kind of magic to bring ideas to life"

As has been its custom for the past several years, the Academy of Television Arts and sciences sponsored a dual awards presentation this year. On the evening of Saturday, September 6, 1980 the Academy held its Sixth Annual Banquet honoring Creative Arts in Television in the Exhibition Hall of the Pasadena Center.

On the following evening, Sunday, September 7, the Academy telecast over the ABC Television Network its Thirty-Second Annual Emmy Awards for Nighttime Programming. The program originated in the Pasadena Civic Auditorium.

In the wake of an industry-wide strike by actor members of SAG and AFTRA, there was, up until the very last minute, considerable speculation as to whether the telecast would go on at all, since actors traditionally serve as presenters and they had already announced that they would boycott the event.

The show did go on, however-but just barely. With writers, directors and network executives substituting for the more colorful actors, the telecast was a lackluster affair and it ran much too long. Co-hosts Dick Clark and Steve Allen, risking the wrath of their performer colleagues, made a valiant effort to keep things light with their snappy patter, but the effect was rather hollow. Both Clark and Allen announced that they were donating their "substantial fees" to a re lief fund for the striking actors.

Actually, the Creative Awards Banquet, held the evening before, was a much more lively and successful affair. Not telecast, it had several actors (including the militantly pro-strike Ed Asner) as presenters and the atmosphere was warm and intimate.

For readers of American Cinematographer the key awards were the two EMMY statuettes presented in separate categories of cinematography. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sixth Annual Emmy Awards Creative Arts in Television
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.