Survey Reveals Internet in Broadband Services

Information Today, July/August 1997 | Go to article overview

Survey Reveals Internet in Broadband Services


In a national survey of 1,000 adults, three out of four under the age of 45 expressed interest and wanted to know more about Broadband services, after those services were defined. In addition, these younger adults are more excited about being able to do more things from home. Almost three-quarters of them are looking forward to the new services from cable TV, the Internet, World Wide Web, and computer online services, compared to 52 percent of those 45 and older. Households with children were also highly enthusiastic, with 71 percent expressing excitement.

The study was conducted by Roper Starch Worldwide on behalf of MediaOne, the Broadband services arm of U.S. WEST Media Group.

MediaOne offers a variety of Broadband services including, in some of its service areas, access to the Internet and online services for entertainment, news, and information, delivered 50 times faster than by telephone lines. MediaOne, which unveiled its new corporate identity and strategic positioning earlier this month, commissioned Roper Starch to conduct a consumer study and measure public attitudes and interests in new technology and Broadband services.

Consumer interest in sophisticated Broadband television service is high, particularly among those groups making the most use of online services. Seventy-five percent of the respondents in that category expressed interest.

"MediaOne is a Broadband services company that will build on our rich entertainment heritage and continue to develop and implement the most sophisticated technology for delivering vital and exciting services to our customers," said Amos B. Hostetter Jr., MediaOne's CEO. "Our research through Roper Starch reveals that the public has a large appetite for what we have to offer."

The MediaOne/Roper Starch study found that:

The use of most interest for the new technology will be self-improvement, rather than entertainment, news, or other online activities. The top-tier benefits include obtaining information from libraries (60 percent) and learning a new skill or taking a college course (59 percent). Second-tier benefits include entertainment (watch-ondemand movies; ordering tickets for shows, events, and the arts) and being able to conduct tasks from home such as banking and investing (about onethird of all Americans). …

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