Evil Has Its Charms

By Liggera, J | Literature/Film Quarterly, January 1, 1992 | Go to article overview

Evil Has Its Charms


Liggera, J, Literature/Film Quarterly


Evil Has Its Charms Wheeler Winston Dixon, The Charm of Evil: The Life and Films of Terence Fisher (The Scarecrow Filmmakers Series, 26) intro. by John Carpenter, 591 pp. photos, 1991 ISBN 0-8108-2375-6 $59.50, and Wheeler Winston Dixon, The Films of Freddie Francis (The Scarecrow Filmmakers Series, 24), 318 pp. photos, 1991, ISBN 0-8108-2358-6, $37.50.

These two British directors both worked fast and cheap for Hammer Films, and made a reputation for horror movies. Fisher was happy in that genre, but Francis felt trapped. No wonder, for his career is studded with awards as director of photography that go back to the gritty black and white of Sons and Lovers (1960) and come forward to Glory (1989). For both of these, he earned Academy Awards. John Huston liked him so much for his efforts on Moby Dick, he knew he would have to leave in order to grow. However, when he shifted to directing. Hammer's exploitation mill was all that was available. He was imprisoned there until he came back as a cinematographer on David Lynch's The Elephant Man (1980). According to some fascinating, long interviews, which form the basis of Wheeler Dixon's book, Francis still hopes to direct more personal projects, something more like his ill-fated production of Dylan Thomas's moldering script for The Doctor and The Devils (1985), a screenplay based on nineteenth century "resurrectionists" (grave robbers) who actually killed to provide fresh corpses for a doctor.

The Films of Freddie Francis is the shorter of Dixon's latest studies for Scarecrow Press's Filmmakers Series. Francis comes through as a lively man who needed to work and whose opus can be brilliant-the look he provided for Jack Clayton's adaptation of James's The Turn of The Screw, The Innocents (1961)-or awful as was his Trog (1970), Joan Crawford's last film. Francis is very active for a man in his seventies, but is still best known for his past shock films such as Paranoiac (1962), starring the young Oliver Reed. Of these films and the cult following which adores them, Francis seems genuinely embarrassed. They merely want shock, or so Francis perceives, based on his meetings with fans at various horror film festivals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Evil Has Its Charms
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.