A Race against Time: Racial Heresies for the 21st Century

By McNish, Ian | Mankind Quarterly, Summer 2007 | Go to article overview

A Race against Time: Racial Heresies for the 21st Century


McNish, Ian, Mankind Quarterly


A Race Against Time: Racial Heresies for the 21st Century Ed. George McDaniel New Century Books, Oakton, Va. 2003

This 330 page symposium, comprising no less than 38 well-written papers by a variety of contributing authors, should possibly be more directly classified as political science than as either anthropology or sociology. Its subject matter, however, definitely falls within the latter classification, since it is primarily concerned with race, race relations, demography, and crime in contemporary America.

The editor, George McDaniel, has arranged the papers into five sections. The first, entitled Current Events, includes ten papers dealing with racism, anti-racism, race relations, multiculturalism, crime, and white flight from hitherto predominantly white neighborhoods. The second, entitled The Past, includes twelve papers dealing with the history of race consciousness and race relations in the U.S., and includes sidelights on the intellectual impact of the U.S. Civil War, the Mexican war, desegregation and legally enforced school integration.

These two sections are followed by a third entitled Science, comprising five papers that seek to define the meaning of the word "race", tell how group differences in intelligence may contribute to sociocultural differences, and even speak to psychopathology. …

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