Australian Indigenous Knowledge and Libraries

By Frideres, J. S. | The Canadian Journal of Native Studies, January 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Australian Indigenous Knowledge and Libraries


Frideres, J. S., The Canadian Journal of Native Studies


Nakata, M. and M. Langton (editors), Australian Indigenous Knowledge and Libraries, 2005. Canberra, Australian Academic and Research Libraries, pp. 216, colour and black and white plates.

The papers included in this interdisciplinary collection of readings emerged out of a colloquium that brought together professionals, practitioners and academics to discuss the role, obligation and responsibilities of library/archive services in Australia with regard to Indigenous knowledge. Some of the papers are written from the perspective of the collecting institutions, others from the community and still others reveal the perspective of users. In the end, the collage of papers represent theoretical assessments, practical discussions about setting up library services, descriptions of existing programs, technical presentations about how Information Technology can be used, and more analytical papers on such issues as the traformative power of global trade agreements like the General Agreements on Trade in Services. In the end, it looks at the whole picture of a multitiered system in which local, regional and national constituents have a stake in how Indigenous knowledge is to be treated in the public sector.

While one might wonder about the transferability of the material from Australia to their countries with Indigenous populations such as Canada, the fit was easy for this reader. As I read each chapter, I was able to find Canadian counterparts in the discussion. Issues such as digital technology, protocol, intellectual property were easy fits and raised a number of thorny questions which Canadians have yet to discuss with their Indigenous populations. In a sense, it was surprising to realize that the Australian libraries/archives seem to be well advance on issues of dealing with Indigenous knowledge compared to other Western countries. The creation of Indigenous Knowledge Centres and the development of protocols for libraries, archives and informations services with regard to indigenous knowledge could provide blueprints for Canadian institutions to build upon as they finally develop the strategies and policies that need urgently to be put in place. The historical destruction of Indigenous knowledge, its current fragile existence and the uncertain future all demand immediate action to preserve and protect it. Protocols on the documentation, storage and proper use of Indigenous knowledge in Canada are past due.

Chapters that focus on issues such as the history of the archive, its role and function, the relationship between power and Indigenous knowledge and the issue of intellectual property provide powerful pieces that force the reader to reflect on how organizations in Canada that hold Indigenous knowledge have dealt with the issue. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Australian Indigenous Knowledge and Libraries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.