The Five Best Photographed Motion Pictures of 1972

American Cinematographer, May 1973 | Go to article overview

The Five Best Photographed Motion Pictures of 1972


In this time of convulsive transition and revolutionary technological change within the motion picture industry, certain truths remain constant-one of these being the fact that film is, first and foremost, primarily a visual medium. Because this is so, the special contribution of the cinematographer to the general excellence and audience impact of any motion picture presentation is, and always will be, of paramount importance.

The tools of the trade used by the Director of Photography and his crew continue to grow more compact, more efficient and more automated. His metier is much more than a kind of reflex expertise born of vast experience in his chosen field. It involves such all-important intangibles as taste and style and a peculiar gut-feeling for achieving the specific images that will best tell the story.

It is these abstractions of technique which make the work of each cinematographer distinctive-and variable, depending upon the dramatic demands of specific screen vehicles. How, then is it possible to choose a single "best" from among the highly diversified challenges which cameramen face during the course of a single production year?

Five superlatively photographed motion pictures were nominated for the Best Achievement in Cinematography "Oscar" to be bestowed during the 45th Annual Academy Awards Presentation. Obviously, only one could be the recipient of the cherished statuette. But the members of the American Society of Cinematographers consider the nominations for this highest accolade to be as important as the Award itself, and it is with that thought in mind that the membership of ASC salutes with pride the following Directors of Photography who received nominations in the category of "Best Achievement in Cinematography" for the Academy's 45th Annual Awards Presentation:

GEOFFREY UNSWORTH, BSC

"Cabaret"

CHARLES B. LANG, ASC

"Butterflies Are Free"

HAROLD E. STINE, ASC

"The Poseidon Adventure"

DOUGLAS SLOCOMBE, BSC

"Travels With My Aunt"

HARRY STRADLING, JR., ASC

"1776"

"CABARET"-photographed by Geoffrey Unsworth, BSC, is the highly successful film adaption of a stage hit musical that takes place in Germany during that frantic period just before Hitler came to power. Technically impeccable, Unsworth's photography captures the decadent, hectic spirit of the era with sharp authenticity and his mobile camera floats with equal ease through the smoke-filled den that is the cabaret, a genteel-tacky rooming house and various mansions, converting the static stage original into pure cinema. …

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