FILM '73: Film Plus Tape

By Lightman, Herb A | American Cinematographer, September 1973 | Go to article overview

FILM '73: Film Plus Tape


Lightman, Herb A, American Cinematographer


In London, the British Kinematograph Sound and Television Society holds its third biennial International Technology Conference and Exhibition

On the plane, en route to London, I speculated as to whether FILM '73 could possibly turn out to be as much of a crashing success as its predecessors, FILM '69 and FILM '71, had been.

This event- sub-titled: International Technology Conference and Exhibition -is held every two years and has elements of Photokina, an SMPTE Conference and a UNIATEC Conference. Yet, it is a duplicate of none of these- having a distinct character all its own.

Looking back now, I can say, in all sincerity, that FILM '73 was very definitely a successful and memorable event. Sponsored by the British Kinematograph Sound and Television Society, and headquartered at London's Royal Lancaster Hotel, it was extremely well organized- with BKSTS Secretary Paul McGurk serving as chief organizer.

From the logistics standpoint alone the affair was impressive. More than 1,000 delegates from thirty-three countries attended- including sizable delegations from Russia, the People's Republic of China and the U.S.A., all of which reinforced the reputation of the conference as the largest film and television industry convention to be held outside of America.

The theme title of the Conference: "FILM PLUS TAPE", rather definitely acknowledged the growing importance of video as a technological partner with film in the presentation of program material (for television, at least) and served as a basis for some lively debates.

Thirty-two papers, presented in eight separate sessions, formed the basis of the papers program at FILM '73. TJ-iese papers covered a wide range of topics concerned with the film, television and allied industries.

In a separate exhibition hall, on the hotel's lower level, manufacturers of various forms of communications equipment demonstrated some of the latest developments in this field. In all, 55 manufacturers were represented in the equipment exhibition. There were quite a few new items which I found to be interesting, and there are product reports on some of them, beginning on Page 1140 of this issue of American Cinematographer. Unfortunately, space limitations preclude reporting on all of the items worthy of such recognition, but we will try to cover them in future issues.

There were so many Americans (mainly from Hollywood) attending FILM '73, that I almost felt as if I hadn't left home. Among those whom I recall having encountered were: Dick Sullivan and Ken Mason of Eastman Kodak (Hollywood); Loren Ryder, of Ryder Sound Services; Sid Solow, of Consolidated Film Industries, Neal Keehn, of DeLuxe-General Laboratories; Herb Farmer, of the University of Southern California Cinema Department; Stan Miller, of Rosco Laboratories, Inc.; Technical Consultants Milton Forman and Richard Glickman; Ed DiGiulio and Abbott Sidney, of Cinema Products Corporation; Harry Teitel- baum, of Hollywood Film Co.; and several others.

Among those from other countries whom I enjoyed seeing again were my British buddies (too numerous to name) and such luminaries as Prof. B.N. Kono- plev, Technical Director of Mosfilm Studios in Moscow and Lars Swanberg, Technical Director of the Swedish Film Institute. Conspicuously missing (and very much missed by those of us privi- leged to call him "friend") was David Samuelson, Immediate Past President of BKSTS, who was, unfortunately, indis- posed, due to illness. (At this writing, he is on the mend and doing nicely - thank you.)

The papers program covered such general categories as: Survey of the State of the Art, Image Quality, Elec- tronic Reproduction of Film, Studio Lighting Methods, Film Versus Tape, Sound Recording Reproduction, Educa- tion and Training, and New Film Equip- ment.

Certain selected papers, which we felt would be of particular interest to American Cinematographer readers, are excerpted in this issue, beginning on Page 1122. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

FILM '73: Film Plus Tape
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.