Awareness about Different Cultural Groups: A Review of Narrative & Experience in Multicultural Education

By Djebrane, Mohammed; Burciaga, Laura C. et al. | Multicultural Education, Summer 2007 | Go to article overview

Awareness about Different Cultural Groups: A Review of Narrative & Experience in Multicultural Education


Djebrane, Mohammed, Burciaga, Laura C., Duarte, Laura, Runkles, Grace, Multicultural Education


Awareness about Different Cultural Groups: A Review of Narrative & Experience in Multicultural Education Reviewed by Mohammed Djebrane, Laura C. Burciaga, Laura Duarte, & Grace Runkles Narrative & Experiencein Multicultural EducationEdited by Joann Phillion, Ming Fang He, & F. Michael ConnellyThousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications2005ISBN 1-4129-0583-4$39.95

Introduction

The purpose of multicultural education is to create awareness about issues that affect different cultural groups. In an effort to eliminate social inequalities, multicultural education has been studied and researched from multiple perspectives. The book, Narrative and Experience in Multicultural Education, edited by Joann Phillion, Ming Fang He, and F. Michael Connelly, describes multiculturalism through a broad scope of interpretations and definitions among different cultures.

The book offers an innovative way of looking at educational research from a vicarious point of view that allows the reader to become engaged and experience the text through the eyes of the researcher and research participants. It creates a simple understanding of the text and allows its readers to reach their own conclusions as they experience multiculturalism in different contexts.

The book describes numerous cultures along with their socio-economic status, political perspectives, traditions, geographic locations, and the historical challenges and frustrations they face on a daily basis. This approach reveals challenges and frustrations are not only from other cultures/ethnic groups but are also from within their own family/culture.

Book Componentsand Summary

Narrative and Experience in Multicultural Education is an assemblage of research and analysis of fifteen authors' experiences in the study of multicultural education. The book takes us on an inquiry of multiculturalism and the impact that it has on not only teachers and students, but on the educational process as well. It takes us on a journey from North America, specifically the United States and Canada, to Eastern European continents as well as Arab countries, in an effort to provide the reader with various examples to allow one to develop a clear understanding of multiculturalism.

The authors describe their experiences and explain multiculturalism by providing a description of the research site and participants, allowing the reader to share in the researchers' experience through imagination. The editors and authors encourage the reader to use an "experiential" as well as an "imaginative" eye when reading the text. The methods employed in the writing of the text provide a distinct approach to describing each author's experience. It is set up as "a day in the life of..." style of writing. Each chapter in the book contains comprehensive research data and references to support the observations and conclusions made by the authors.

The book is well organized and divided into six units that address the concerns of African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, as well as International Multicultural Teacher Education Issues, Narrative Methodology and Multicultural Education Research, and Multiculturalism in Democratic and Community Life. The six units contain of fifteen chapters, with chapters one and fifteen being an introduction and a conclusion written by the editors of the book.

Units one through three embark on research conducted in North America and address the unanswered inequality, injustice, and strains between different ethnic groups, specifically Whites, Blacks, Latinos, and Native Americans. Unit four focuses on an international context and deals with educators teaching in multicultural settings. The idea they represent is one where encouraging dialogue is the best way to teach others to be accepting, thus leading to understanding. The authors in this unit talk about tensions or problems that arise in discussions, but also offer solutions and examples of outcomes that demonstrate how open dialogue allows us to attain our goals of appreciation and acceptance of other groups. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Awareness about Different Cultural Groups: A Review of Narrative & Experience in Multicultural Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.