Immensely Useful

By Arnold, Morris S. | Judicature, July/August 2007 | Go to article overview

Immensely Useful


Arnold, Morris S., Judicature


Immensely useful Business and Commercial Litigation in Federal Courts, second edition, edited by Robert L. Haig. West/ABA. 2005. 8 volumes, one CD-ROM of forms and jury charges. $1,008.

I had occasion to remark in these pages eight years ago (May-June 1999), when the first edition of this masterly work appeared, that it was a significant contribution to modern legal literature. The new edition of this immensely useful and clearheaded collection is a most welcome and gready expanded version of its predecessor. This new version features 16 additional chapters and 47 new authors. It appears as well that all of the chapters that have been retained from the first edition have been revised, some more than others.

Robert L. Haig, a distinguished lawyer and partner at Kelley Drye & Warren in New York City, who himself has an extraordinarily broad acquaintance with litigation matters, has chosen the 199 authors of the 96 chapters in this work with exemplary care. The contributors include 18 members of the federal bench as well as scores of practitioners, all of whom were quite obviously selected for their expertise and hands-on experience.

A treatise as compendious as this one cannot be adequately described in the limited space that can conscionably be given over to a book review, but a few general comments will help convey the breadth of the work and the effort that has been made to ensure that it is entirely current.

The volumes first trace the progress of a typical federal case from start to finish. They thus begin with procedural matters and proceed logically, with various intermediate stops, to deal with pleading, discovery, motion practice, settlement, trial, judgment, and appeal. The authors then turn their attention to a discussion of various substantive legal areas, including (this is very much a non-exhaustive list) insurance, banking, intellectual property, employment discrimination, ERISA, and commercial law.

Several of the new chapters are devoted to the increasing logistical difficulties that lawyers face in complex federal litigation. These chapters cover such matters as how technology is changing litigation in federal courts, how lawyers can organize large-scale document reviews, and how corporate in-house counsel can manage their greater responsibilities after Congress passed the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in 2002. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Immensely Useful
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.