Managerial Perspectives on Emotional Intelligence Differences between India and the United States: The Development of Research Propositions

By Ilangovan, Aarthi; Scroggins, Wesley A. et al. | International Journal of Management, September 2007 | Go to article overview

Managerial Perspectives on Emotional Intelligence Differences between India and the United States: The Development of Research Propositions


Ilangovan, Aarthi, Scroggins, Wesley A., Rozell, Elizabeth J., International Journal of Management


This paper is a theoretical investigation into the effects of cultural differences on emotional intelligence levels of Americans and Indians working for American firms in the United States. The cultural dimensions defined by Hofstede and the emotional intelligence model conceptualized by Goleman are used to develop propositions about the dimensions of emotional intelligence that might be affected by specific dimensions of the culture of India and United States. Culturally related differences in emotional intelligence are likely to have implications for the management of culturally diverse individuals, especially in certain work contexts. Implications for practicing managers and directions for future research are discussed.

Multinational organizations require a cadre of skilled managers and employees to be effective in their global operations. One competency that has received increased attention and is believed to be important to worker effectiveness is that of emotional intelligence (Kelley & Caplan, 1993; Sosik & Megerian, 1999; Sternberg, 1996). Given the popularity of the emotional intelligence construct in both the academic and practitioner literature and its prominence in many global organizations, little research exists that examines the cross-cultural relevancy of the construct and the implications for the management of culturally related emotional intelligence differences in a culturally diverse workforce (Shipper, 2003). Prior research (Shipper, 2003) indicates that emotional intelligence varies from culture to culture. With the rapid growth in the informational technology sector in the United States, the demand for skilled workers from countries such as India and China continues to increase (Karachiwala, 2000). Estimates indicate that that there are now more than 1.5 million people of Indian origin in the United States, with approximately 72.3% participating in the work force. About 300,000 Indians work in technology firms in California's Silicon Valley (Embassy of India). Furthermore, according to Saxenian (2000), Indians form 15% of Silicon Valley's skilled manpower. The cultural diversification of the workforce makes the need for studying the impact of cultural differences on emotional intelligence important.

This paper is a theoretical investigation of the cultural differences impacting the emotional intelligence of Asian Indians working in American organizations. The paper is divided into four major sections. The first section discusses the cultural differences impacting emotional intelligence based on cultural dimensions of Hofstede (2003). The second section defines and briefly explores the emotional intelligence construct as developed in India and United States. Section three combines the dimensions of culture and emotional intelligence to derive theoretical propositions regarding emotional intelligence differences between Indians and Americans. Finally, section four provides a discussion and implications for management in effectively tapping the emotional competence of its Indian employees in American firms.

India is a typical representative of the classical east culture. The United States is often considered a prototype of the classic western culture. We argue that notable differences in the cultures of India and United States will create differences in the emotional intelligence profiles of members from those cultures. The next section examines cultural differences between the two countries that form the foundation for our propositions.

Cultural Differences Impacting Emotional Intelligence

Hofstede (2003) presents five dimensions to identify and categorize a country's culture. Hofstede reports great differences between the Indian and American cultures on three of these dimensions: power distance, individualism-collectivism, and long-term orientation. We briefly discuss the cultural differences on these three dimensions.

Power Distance Index

Power distance focuses on the degree of equality, or inequality, between people in the country's society. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Managerial Perspectives on Emotional Intelligence Differences between India and the United States: The Development of Research Propositions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.