State by State

By Scanlan, Laura Wolff | Humanities, September/October 2007 | Go to article overview

State by State


Scanlan, Laura Wolff, Humanities


Around the Nation

A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities Councils

ALABAMA

The Alabama Prison Arts and Education kicks off its 2007 series in September with classes in creative writing, visual arts, literature, history, and photography at correctional facilities across the state.

The John Henry and Railroad Heritage Festival runs September 13 through 16 in Leeds. Events include tours, music, and a symposium on September 15 about myth, oral tradition, and the historical nature of the John Henry legend. As part of Community Read 2007, David Baldacd talks about his book Wish You Well at Goose Pond Civic Center in Scottsboro on September 19.

ARIZONA

The Tempe Center for the Arts hosts an exhibition marking the thirtieth anniversary of Childsplay, a nonprofit touring theater company that has been performing in Arizona schools since its founding in 1977.

Beginning in September, the Mesa Historical Museum displays '"Thanks for Tuning In: The Wallace and Ladmo Show," chronicling the children's television program that aired in the region from 1954 to 1989.

"The Mexican American Mirror: Reflections of Our City's Heritage" opens October 12 at the Phoenix Museum of History.

COLORADO

Two Rivers Chautauqua presents "1776: The Birth of a Nation" at the Museum of Western Colorado's Cross Orchards Historic Site on September 28 and 29. Statesman Benjamin Franklin, poet Phillis Wheatley, President Thomas Jefferson, and author J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur are among the historic characters to be portrayed.

On October 17, the Colorado Center for the Book presents its annual awards at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts. This year, more than fifty authors, poets, photographers, and illustrators are being honored.

CONNECTICUT

Three exhibitions sponsored by the Connecticut Humanities Council are on display. "Landscape of Change" is at the Fairfield Museum and History Center; "Bombshells, Bond Rallies, and Blackouts: Waterbury in World War II" is at the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury; and "Over There: Windsor and World War I" is at the Windsor Historical Society.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Don Murray, chair of the Humanities Council of Washington, D.C, and Carol Fennelly, executive director of Hope House, discuss the "Hope House D.C. Prison Poets Project" on October 9. Hope House assists federal inmates through poetry workshops and discussions about their life experiences. The discussion will be taped and made available through October on DCTV, the District's public access television station.

FLORIDA

Folklorists Tina Bucuvalas and Kristin Congdon present a slideshow and discussion about Mario Sanchez and Key West folk artists on October 10 at the Key West Armory Building. Sanchez, the grandson of a Cuban immigrant cigar worker, depicted the Old Key West of his childhood in his painted woodcarvings.

To mark the fortieth anniversary of consolidation of Jacksonville city and Duval county governments, historian James Crooks moderates a panel discussion on the political climate of the time on October 6 at the Jacksonville Main Public Library.

Singer and songwriter Chris Kahl presents "Orange Blossom Memories: Songs of Florida," at Pinellas County's Weedon Island Preserve Cultural and Natural History Center on September 21, the Lakes Region Library on September 29, and the Bartow Public Library on October 16.

Historian Gary Mormino talks about Florida's history and diversity on September 30 at Miami's "Vizcaya Museum and Gardens.

Photographer and author Gary Monroe discusses the work of Harold Newton, a self-taught African-American landscape painter from Fort Pierce, on September 18 at Historic Owens School House in Arcadia, and October 11 at Blake Library in Stuart.

An historic portrayal of Marjory Stoneman Douglas, author of the 1947 book The Everglades: River of Grass, is being presented by Betty Jean Steinshouer on October 18 at The Emerson Center in Vero Beach, October 22 at the Boynton Beach City Library, and October 23 at the Tamarac Branch Library. …

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