African American Education from A to Z

By Tate, Thelma | Black Issues in Higher Education, August 7, 1997 | Go to article overview

African American Education from A to Z


Tate, Thelma, Black Issues in Higher Education


African American Education From A to Z

This unique, well-organized and well documented work is an essential source about African American education that fills a noticeable gap in resources in this area. It brings together a collection of laws, biographies, concepts, journals, movements, organizations, and institutions from varied sources and presents them in a single, useful volume.

The Encyclopedia of African American Education covers such topics as "The Little Rock Nine," "Ideological Origins of African American Education," "Voting Rights Act of 1965," "Shad Sisters of Washington, D.C.," "Teachers, African American, Recruitment and Shortages," "Underclass," "Self-Concept Development and Education," "Self Help Tradition, African Americans," as well as the "Yale Child Study Center," and "A Better Chance, Inc."

A key feature of the work is the extensive number of public laws related to the education of African Americans with full-text location in The United States Statutes At Large, The United Supreme Court Reports, and the like. The selected bibliography and the names of the authors at the end of each section provide additional options for research on the topic. Also, the bibliography at the end of the volume includes many excellent works for further readings.

The encyclopedia is a scholarly work developed by world renowned authors such as historians Rayford W. Logan and Michael R. Winston, and Richard Kluger, author of Simple Justice. Logan, Winston and Kluger focused on Charles Hamilton -- who, in addition to serving as editor of the Harvard Law Review, was a key counselor of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). In fact, Hamilton helped plan the organization's campaign against racial segregation in public schools that culminated in the U.S. Supreme Court's 1954 ruling in Brown v. The Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas.

Discussions about multicultural education are at the forefront of many aspects of our society -- from the early education of children to the halls of academe, from employment offices to businesses and industries. Margo Okazawa-Rey defines this broad category of theories and practices by looking at the history of the development of the term, major principles on which multicultural education rest, and strategies for bringing about a multicultural society. Users of this work will find discussions of the impact of European and European Americans on the overall society, the problems of schooling, the goal of intergroup education, and comments about critics of multicultural education.

Some of the uniqueness of this book is reflected in a section on "White-Flight" authored by Faustine C. Jones-Wilson. Because many works in the social sciences have limited or no coverage of such topics, educators, sociologists, business specialists and people with similar interests will find this an excellent tool for identifying, defining and explaining many terms related to the phenomenon of White families fleeing desegregated schools. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

African American Education from A to Z
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.