The President's Page

By Wyton, Alec | The American Organist, October 2007 | Go to article overview

The President's Page


Wyton, Alec, The American Organist


PART of a Cathedral Organist's happy responsibility is the daily teaching and accompaniment of Psalms, and odd verses crop up constantly in all manner of joyful situations. Verse 24 of Psalm 118 goes: "This is the day which the Lord hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it."

And here, then, is MUSIC / The A.G.O. Magazine, full of life, hope, and integrity. It must speak for itself and we all must support it, criticize and praise it and give our best selves to it. Then it will represent us truly in the wide, teeming world in which our great profession must play an increasingly important part.

We are at a milestone in the history of our Guild. It is many decades since the American Guild of Organists voted to send its news and the subscriptions of its members to Mr. Siegfrid Gruenstein's Diapason. That relationship was mutually valuable and we want, on this significant day, to wish The Diapason every good thing in its continuing independent life.

Our Guild is made up of so diverse a membership that it would seem humanly impossible to reach all of us helpfully all the time. Yet we must try. I happen to believe very firmly that those of us who labor with what I like to call "humble resources" need the Guild almost more than those whose every need seems to be granted before they ask. MUSIC / The A.G.O. Magazine can be a splendid instrument in the sharing of our talents and we must all see that it is.

One of our finest and strongest Chapters is in Anchorage, Alaska. It has about 20 members, and how vitally alive they are. My thirty-minute meeting with their Dean and some of his officers in the Anchorage Airport early last April was perhaps the most moving experience I have had as your President. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The President's Page
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.