News and Notices

The Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Autumn 2007 | Go to article overview

News and Notices


The Arkansas Historical Association (AHA) invites presentation proposals for its sixty-seventh annual conference in Eureka Springs, March 27-29, 2008. The conference theme will be "Land of Eccentricity." The AHA welcomes proposals dealing with the unique, interesting and oddball aspects of Arkansas history. Presentations will be limited to twenty minutes. The use of audio-visual elements is encouraged. Please send proposals of approximately 200 words to: Timothy G. Nutt, program chair, University of Arkansas Libraries, 365 N. Mcllroy Avenue, Fayetteville, AR 72701; timn@uark.edu; 479-575-8443. Proposals should include a mailing address, phone number, and, if possible, an email address. Proposals may be submitted by email. Please contact the program chair with any questions.

The Arkansas Historical Association announces the Violet B. Gingles and Lucille Westbrook Local History competitions for 2008. Entries must be postmarked no later than January 15, 2008 to be eligible.

The Westbrook Local History Award, which consists of a $ 1,000 prize and a framed certificate, is presented for the best manuscript article on a local Arkansas topic. The article must deal with some phase of neighborhood, city, county, or regional history or some person associated with local Arkansas history. Edited documents and memoirs will be considered for this award. Entries must not have been submitted elsewhere or published previously.

The Gingles Award of $500 and a framed certificate is presented to the person who writes the best manuscript article on any Arkansas history topic. The article can deal with any phase of the history of the state or with any individual connected with its past. Entries must not have been submitted elsewhere or published previously.

Anyone, whether professional or amateur historian, is eligible to submit a manuscript. A panel of judges will determine the placement of entries in either the Westbrook or Gingles category. An entry will not be considered for both prizes, and the Arkansas Historical Association reserves the right not to award one or both of the prizes in a given year.

Manuscripts should be no longer than thirty-five pages and must be documented. Text, including quotations and footnotes, should be doublespaced. Footnotes should be numbered consecutively and appear in a separate section at the end of the text. Since manuscripts are evaluated anonymously, only the full title of the article should appear at the top of the first page of the manuscript. On a separate page, the following information should be included: title; author's name; complete address; and telephone numbers.

Entries must be submitted in triplicate-photocopies must be clear and easily readable. All articles will be considered for publication in the Arkansas Historical Quarterly. If the article is not published, one copy will be returned to the author and one copy will be placed in Special Collections, University of Arkansas Libraries. Entries should be sent by the January 15, 2008, deadline to: Arkansas Historical Association, Department of History, Old Main 416, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701

Since 2002, the Arkansas Historical Association has presented the J. G. Ragsdale Book Award in Arkansas History annually for the best booklength historical study (nonfiction) of any aspect of Arkansas history. The author will receive a prize of $ 1,000 and a certificate, given in honor of J. G. Ragsdale, a 1919 graduate of the University of Arkansas. Ragsdale was a founding member of the Arkansas Historical Association and chaired the board of trustees at the University of Arkansas. The award will be presented on March 28, 2008, at the annual conference of the Arkansas Historical Association in Eureka Springs. The publisher will be honored with a certificate of merit and a grateful letter of transmittal.

Eligible works shall include book-length historical studies written in English and published in the two calendar years preceding the Arkansas Historical Association's annual conference in March. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

News and Notices
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.