Caution: Runaway Metaphor Alert

By LaRocque, Paula | The Quill, October 1, 2007 | Go to article overview

Caution: Runaway Metaphor Alert


LaRocque, Paula, The Quill


Mixed, mangled or overdone metaphor is a leading contender for the Silly Little Mistake That Stops Readers Dead in Their Tracks Award.

Consider this from a newspaper story: "She realized she had been walking blindly through life, mired in a void." It's "mired in a void" that stops you. You can be mired in, well, a mire. But a void is an empty space. Can you be mired in an empty space? And if so, what is it that's miring you, exactly? Not much, come to think of it: This passage says she had been walking, not mired.

News writing is littered with such failed attempts at colorful expression - expression that makes readers marvel or, worse, laugh. On the one hand, you want to say at least they're trying. And on the other, you want to say ewwww.

Take this metaphor (please): "Pus still oozed from the unhealed wounds of the Black Hawk Indian War as young James entered boyhood."

Here's a handful of missed metaphors from newspapers:

* "Perhaps because of labor's weakened condition, managements with iron fists are lifting the sword for the final kill." This sentence shows why successful metaphor sticks with a single governing image. You can skip the iron fists if you have a sword.

* "The conductor navigated Verdi's Requiem with the touch of a surgeon." Navigate is a seafaring term, so related expression must likewise be seafaring - for example: navigated the shoals of Verdi's Requiem with the skill of a sea captain. Surgeon, however, is a medical term, so it mixes the metaphor.

* "The dirty trick is a scenario that some Republicans hope they can pull out of the mothballs yet again." This metaphor goes a couple steps too far by mixing a figurative scenario with figurative mothballs. First, a dirty trick is not a "scenario," even figuratively speaking. A scenario is a synopsis of a play, a libretto of an opera, a shooting script of a screenplay, etc. So it's not a successful metaphor for a dirty trick. And it's probably too much to pull a dirty trick from the mothballs, let alone a scenario.

* "Mazursky could have woven an enchanting fable from the fabric of Shakespeare's 'Tempest,' except for one thing: A fable should be short and sweet." We don't weave something from a fabric, we weave something into a fabric. Metaphorically more sensible: "Mazursky could have woven an enchanting fable from the threads of Shakespeare's 'Tempest. …

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