No Pain, No Gain

By Hunsicker, Ronald J. | Behavioral Healthcare, September 2007 | Go to article overview

No Pain, No Gain


Hunsicker, Ronald J., Behavioral Healthcare


Our society emphasizes the path of least resistance, which makes working toward true recovery difficult

This past summer our national appetite for sensational and tragic stories of high-profile individuals was fed constant headlines about Lindsay Lohan and Britney Spears. These two individuals provided material for every established and aspiring comedian, as well as for tabloid and other newspapers and magazines, not to mention online media. Much of the focus was on Spears' and Lohans aberrant behavior and seemingly cavalier attitude toward addiction treatment. Noticeably absent was much in-depth reporting or speculation on the seriousness of their disease or the consequences of it going untreated. The fact that addiction is a chronic, progressive disease that can be fatal if left untreated has yet to receive broad public understanding and acceptance.

Spears' and Lohans experience with addiction treatment is evidence of a larger social dilemma. Our society is drifting in the direction of believing that we are entitled to be happy, not feel pain, and live as we please. Consequences for our behavior and coming to grips with our limitations and shortcomings are not highly valued. Our society runs the risk of actually believing that we are entitled to be happy all the time and that pain, suffering, and unhappiness are to be avoided at all costs. Such a sense of entitlement is the precursor to thinking that pain and hard work are unnecessary for happiness.

Yet if recovery is the ultimate goal and outcome of addiction treatment, and recovery is a life-changing, life-reorienting experience, then for recovery to be achieved, it must include hard work, pain, and certainly suffering. To grow, change, and recover, it is impossible to not experience some pain, suffering, and discomfort. After all, discomfort is the pathway to growth and recovery.

Our society's growing entitlement approach to life leads people to seek the easy path, the one that asks for the least introspection, demands as little change as possible, and allows people to avoid true recovery. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

No Pain, No Gain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.