The Individual Life Project: A New Way of Discovering the Unborn Child's World and Potentialities

By Soldera, Gino PhD | Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health, Summer 2002 | Go to article overview

The Individual Life Project: A New Way of Discovering the Unborn Child's World and Potentialities


Soldera, Gino PhD, Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health


ABSTRACT: In each individual there is a life project, which can be traced back to conception. The life project exists in the depths of a child's being, close to their essence; from there, it influences all the internal and external processes. The life project contains what a person needs to realize personal potentialities that are present from conception. The life project seldom appears clear to the parents from the beginning although unborn children send signals of their existence and their character. Unfortunately, in our materialistic culture signals from the unborn are systematically ignored, deflected and then forgotten by parents. Education begins from conception and can be properly achieved by parents only if they establish a deep contact with their children, communicating with them, and coming to know their life project.

INTRODUCTION

One merit of prenatal psychology has been to bring to light the fact that there is in each individual a life project that can be traced back to conception. This view posits the idea that from conception there is an individual genetic structure which will accompany the human through his life, and in addition an individual life project, on which his future life will depend. The individual life project, like any project, encompasses what that human being will become, with his personal characteristics, his latent potentialities and his predispositions, which may be developed in the course of his life and may influence his mode of existence.

If we consider the human being as a global and unitary being, we should not forget that from his first formation a genetic structure has been operating within him which is actually psychogenetic, since the genetic components of organic nature co-exist with those of psychic nature; thus the genetic structure can be considered both on the biochemical and on a functional and emotional level. Certain researchers on this subject posit the existence of E-DNA or emotional DNA, derived from the emotions that parents transmit to their child through heredity or during pregnancy.1

What the unborn child receives, as an inheritance from his parents, is the sum of the competence and wisdom achieved by humanity as it has evolved to date, and which is now uniquely and originally present in him, and ready to be learned and experienced.

For this reason, the human being shouldn't be considered as a tabula rasa, a white cloth to be colored in, or an empty bag to be filled in, but rather as a fully alive and dynamic reality who from the outset deserves attention and respect, which serve to establish significant contact and initiate meaningful exchange.

The unborn child brings something new and precious to life, a message to his parents, his family, his society, and to humanity as a whole, enabling this last to continue in renewal and evolution towards an ever better quality of life.

Acknowledging the existence of a human being as full and complete from the outset is of fundamental importance to the kind of relationship the parents will establish with him; this relationship bears substantially on the kinds of experience the newborn will undergo, and constitutes the primary material of his education through the relations and attitudes directed towards him from outside.

We can thus say that in the unborn child there is innate and particular knowledge, difficult to accede to precisely because it is deeprooted in the individual; and that this will play an important role in determining his life choices. Of course, this innate knowledge is always available to the individual, even if he remains unaware of it. Moreover, it is very different from the knowledge that will later be acquired through life experience, and helps the individual to express himself and make himself known.

INFANT PRODIGIES

Thanks to propitious environmental conditions, infant prodigies such as violinist Yehudi Menuhin, concert pianist Van Cliburn and composer Mozart, were able to express and thus convince people of their abilities during their infancy. …

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