Decision at Sea: Five Naval Battles That Shaped American History

By Stearman, William Lloyd | Naval War College Review, Winter 2007 | Go to article overview

Decision at Sea: Five Naval Battles That Shaped American History


Stearman, William Lloyd, Naval War College Review


Symonds, Craig L. Decision at Sea: Five Naval Battles That Shaped American History. New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 2005. 378pp. $30

What history buff could possibly resist the subtitle "Five Naval Battles That Shaped American History"? Those so enticed will not be disappointed in Craig Symond's exceptionally well written and fascinating accounts of these American naval battles: Oliver Hazard Perry's far-reaching victory over the British in the 10 September 1813 battle for Lake Erie; the 8-9 March 1862 battle of Hampton Roads (which ended in a draw) between America's first iron-clad ships, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia; the 1 May 1898 battle of Manila Bay; the 4 June 1942 battle of Midway; and the 18 April 1988 Operation PRAYING MANTIS in the Persian Gulf.

Because the American navy was absent, Symonds does not list the most crucial naval battle in American history, the early September 1781 battle of the Capes, in which a French fleet prevented the British from resupplying Lord Charles Cornwallis's besieged troops at Yorktown. Nonetheless, he provides a detailed account of this battle, describing it as "the battle that secured American independence." Symonds places special emphasis on crucial command decisions. In this case, he notes, for example, that at a critical moment the British commander, Rear Admiral Thomas Graves, hoisted a flag signal whose ambiguity resulted in failure to concentrate the fleet's fire on the French, who in large measure prevailed because of this blunder.

This book's considerable historical value resides as much in Symonds's highly interesting and detailed description of the British background as in the actual battles. For example, most of us learned in school that impressment by the British of American sailors into the Royal Navy was the prime cause of war in 1812-but I was surprised to read here that some ten thousand were so impressed. …

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