Bias Bill Raises Concern about Gender Identity

By Schoeff, Mark, Jr. | Workforce Management, September 24, 2007 | Go to article overview

Bias Bill Raises Concern about Gender Identity


Schoeff, Mark, Jr., Workforce Management


DISCRIMINATION

At first blush, it seemed that big business was lending support to a bill that would prohibit workplace discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people. Forty-six large companies, including such corporations as Cisco Systems, Coca-Cola, Marriott International, BP America and NCR, are backing the bill, and along with the vast majority of the Fortune 500, they already have inclusive employment practices in place.

But during a House hearing on the legislation in early September, the first business community opposition started to emerge. Employment lawyers raised concerns that it would create a new protected class for gender identity.

Mark Fahleson, an employment lawyer with the firm of Rembolt Ludtke in Lincoln, Nebraska, asserted that the definition was vague and too broad, allowing employees to declare a change in their gender identity at will-without giving the employer advance notice to prepare for such a change in the workplace. The bill requires that companies provide shower or dressing facilities to accommodate actual or perceived gender.

Even though most major employers welcome homosexuals, they are doing so through voluntary policies. A statute would codify a particular approach for companies to follow-and would burden small firms that don't have the HR and legal staffs to manage compliance, according to Fahleson.

"This would put into law definitions and procedures and remedial schemes that include litigation," Fahleson said after the hearing.

The measure has not been scheduled for further action by the House Education and Labor Committee. The bill also falls under the jurisdictions of the three other committees.

As it winds its way through Congress, advocates stress that the measure simply extends to homosexuals the same protections that have been put in place for women, minorities and ethnic groups the past 40 years. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bias Bill Raises Concern about Gender Identity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.