Disciplining Anthropological Demography

By Coast, Ernestina E.; Hampshire, Katherine R. et al. | Demographic Research, January-June 2007 | Go to article overview

Disciplining Anthropological Demography


Coast, Ernestina E., Hampshire, Katherine R., Randall, Sara C., Demographic Research


Abstract

This study furthers the epistemological development of anthropological demography, and its role in understanding the demography of Europe. We sketch out broad issues to stimulate new productive interactions and understanding in order to initiate discussion around the overall research agendas of European anthropological demography. We situate anthropological demography against the context of an evolving world of research in which boundaries between academic disciplines have become much more permeable. This is achieved via an overview of recent theoretical debates about the role and nature of disciplinarity, including interdisciplinarity, multidisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. In order to understand the current state of the art, we sketch out the evolution of anthropological demography, paying particular attention to the different knowledge claims of anthropology and demography. We conclude by summarising the potential disciplinary benefits of interdisciplinarity between anthropology and demography.

1. Introduction

In this chapter we will sketch out broad issues to stimulate new productive interactions and understanding in order to initiate discussion around the overall research agendas of European anthropological demography. Ultimately this chapter aims to further the epistemological development of anthropological demography, and its role in understanding the demography of Europe. We situate anthropological demography against the context of an evolving world of research in which boundaries between academic disciplines have become much more permeable. This is achieved via an overview of recent theoretical debates about the role and nature of disciplinarity, including interdisciplinarity, multidisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. In order to understand the current state of the art, we sketch out the evolution of anthropological demography, paying particular attention to the different knowledge claims of anthropology and demography.4 We conclude by summarising the potential disciplinary benefits of interdisciplinarity between anthropology and demography.

2. Disciplinarity

2.1 Bridging disciplines: The rise of inter-disciplinary research

Anthropological demography needs to be situated against the context of an evolving world of research in which boundaries between academic disciplines have become much more permeable, in both social science (e.g. gender studies) and physical science, and multi- and interdisciplinary research have become more common, although not necessarily more accepted or any easier to do well. The reasons for this increasing mixing of epistemology and method are manifold, and include globalisation (leading to easier and more frequent transfers of information and researchers), technological developments, and postmodernity (Riley & McCarthy 2003). We must also acknowledge the critical role of research funding in both reacting to and shaping this evolution. International organisations, governments and funding agencies often emphasise inter- or multidisciplinary approaches in tackling research agendas, a position based on an understanding that it is at the boundaries and intersections of different disciplines that productive research agendas can be set and addressed.5 The culture of disciplines means that we must recognise that disciplinary knowledge is, of itself, a social product created and shaped by its disciplinary home. Here, a discipline is defined as "any comparatively self-contained and isolated domain of human experience which possess its own community of experts, with distinctive components such as shared goals, concepts, facts, tacit skills and methodologies" (Braun & Schubert, 2003:183). Disciplines differ in the way in which they organise, produce and assess new knowledge - epistemology is a way of knowing, and each discipline has distinctive tools, concepts, methods and language. Disciplines have epistemological commitments (Schoenberger, 2001:367) which manifest through disciplinary culture, an academic social order that reproduces itself and goes beyond mere adherence to disciplinary tools, concepts, methods and language. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Disciplining Anthropological Demography
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.