Born to Live: A Holistic Approach to Childbirth/The Physician within You: Medicine for the Millennium

By Hallett, Elisabeth | Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health, Winter 1998 | Go to article overview

Born to Live: A Holistic Approach to Childbirth/The Physician within You: Medicine for the Millennium


Hallett, Elisabeth, Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health


Gladys Taylor McGarey, Pioneer of Pre-Birth Communication

Born To Live: A Holistic Approach to Childbirth by Gladys Taylor McGarey (1980). (Available from Gladys McGarey Medical Foundation, 7350 E. Stetson Dr. #120, Scottsdale, AZ 85251.)

The Physician Within You: Medicine for the Millennium by Gladys Taylor McGarey with Jess Stearn, (1997). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications, Inc.

Dr. Gladys McGarey's holistic approach to medical care is detailed in her new book with Jess Stearn The Physician Within You: Medicine For the Millennium (1997). Two chapters are devoted to pregnancy, birth, and babies. Equally rich is her earlier book, Born To Live: A Holistic Approach to Childbirth (1980) which contains other remarkable stories of old souls in new bodies. McGarey is a doctor twice over, trained in both allopathic medicine and homeopathy. In a career spanning five decades, she has courageously faced opposition and explored therapies beyond the medical mainstream. She is a founder of the American Holistic Medical Association and past president of that organization. Still practicing in Scottsdale, Arizona, she also serves on the staff of NIH's Office of Alternative Medicine. But Dr. McGarey is a hero to me for a more particular reason. Nearly twenty years ago, she pioneered the concept of soul communication with unborn children.

In her 1980 book Born To Live, Dr. McGarey makes the bold statement, "It is reasonable . . . to believe that we are in reality dealing with a ready-formed individual personality when we usher a baby into this world." This respectful attitude toward babies underlies Dr. McGarey's approach to the pregnant women in her care. "I often ask the mother to try to make contact with the baby," she explains. "I ask her to record her dreams and see if she can contact the baby, also to write letters to the baby telling him how she feels about things, and talk to the baby, to establish an early, helpful soul communication."

It's no longer so unusual to advocate talking to a child in the womb, but it's rarely suggested that we might also try listening and being receptive to impressions and communication coming from the baby. Dr. McGarey has been a pioneer in recognizing that pre-birth communication is a two-way flow. In Born To Live, she shares remarkable stories of contact between parent and child-to-be. As the attending physician, she has an insider's view of these events and is able to put them in context of the mother's life experiences and the family situation.

According to Dr. McGarey, contact happens in various ways. For example, she writes: "I have seen (pregnant) women who discover emotions foreign to their nature and experience, emotions they could not understand. As we watched their dreams, we began to understand that they were apparently picking up psychically the emotions and feelings of the incoming entity. The baby, of course, has feelings and emotions, residuals perhaps from an earlier incarnation."

One story illustrates Dr. McGarey's contention that family planning may be a mutual process, with the child-to-be playing an important part in the arrangements. This family already had four children and had decided that four was enough. However, several years after the fourth arrived, the mother was taking a shower and she saw a blue light appear in the top corner of the shower. Instinctively, she knew what the blue light meant. Another entity was wanting to make its appearance. "Go away," she said, "You know I don't need any more kids!"

A month later, the blue light came back. Again the same dialogue. And again it happened. And again. Finally, the reluctant mother gave in to the persistence of whatever the blue light meant, and she became pregnant. Child number five arrived-a boy. Her family was larger and more complicated, of course, but more enjoyable.

Two years passed by. Once again the mother now of five encountered the blue light while taking a shower. …

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