Sharing Space: A Proposed Course Outline on Pre- and Peri-Natal Psychology

By Verny, Thomas R. Md; Irving, Michael C. Ma | Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal, Winter 1990 | Go to article overview

Sharing Space: A Proposed Course Outline on Pre- and Peri-Natal Psychology


Verny, Thomas R. Md, Irving, Michael C. Ma, Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal


ABSTRACT: Though there is mounting demand by students for information about Pre- and Peri-Natal Psychology there is no such course being offered at a recognized university at this time. The authors, in an attempt to facilitate discussion on this subject and eventual implementation have prepared a course outline.

INTRODUCTION

The course outline that follows is intended to chart the territory of Pre- and Peri-Natal Psychology as we know it. Course leaders will naturally need to change and fashion it according to their own areas of interest and expertise as well as the restraints of hours of instruction available and the level of sophistication and knowledge of the students. The authors would be happy to offer further advice, suggestions and references to academics who are considering offering this course. They would also like to receive information about any courses that are already being given on this subject or courses that incorporate some of these topics.

COURSE OUTLINE ON PRE- AND PERINATAL PSYCHOLOGY

Pre and Perinatal Developmental Psychology

Embryology and Fetology

Focus on Central Nervous System, Audiology

Mental and Emotional-Consciousness, Memory

Pre-Natal Learning

Normal Development

External Stimulation

Psychological Development of Infants

The Psychology of Pregnancy

Psychological Preparation for Pregnancy

Parents

Risk Screening Once Pregnant

Physiological Risks and Requirements During Pregnancy which Impact on Psychological and Developmental Health of Child Smoking, Drugs, Sleep, Rest/Anxiety, Work, etc.

Psychology of Infertility

Third Party Conceptions-Effects on Babies Born in This Way

AI

IVF (Test Tube)

Surrogate Parents

Ethical and Moral Issues

Pre and Perinatal Loss and Grief

Prenatal Death

Perinatal Death

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Postpartum Depression

Pre and Perinatal Psychology and The Family

Pre-natal Communication/Bonding Between Parents/Siblings and Baby

Talking and Playing

Music

Pregnancy and Dreams

Mothers

Fathers

Pre-Natal Classes

Physiological exercises

Psychological Preparation

Psychological Implications of Birthing Practices

Medical Interventions During Pregnancy and Labour ie. Ulltrasound, Amniocentesis, Fetal Heart Monitors-Effects On

Mother

Father

Birthing Staff

Obstetrics esp. Labor and Delivery, Effects of Analgesics and Anesthetics On

Mother

Infant

Choice of Birthing Places and Methods, Midwives, etc. (who, how done) Leboyer type deliver, Advantages and Disadvantages

Post-natal Bonding

Talking, Playing

Breast Feeding

NICU's-What They are and How They Can be Humanized

Pre and Perinatal Influences on Personality

Pioneers of Pre and Perinatal Psychology-Freud, Rank, Fodor, Greenacre, etc. …

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Sharing Space: A Proposed Course Outline on Pre- and Peri-Natal Psychology
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