Raising Arms: Liturgy in the Struggle to Liberate Jerusalem in the Late Middle Ages

By Madden, Thomas F. | The Catholic Historical Review, October 2007 | Go to article overview

Raising Arms: Liturgy in the Struggle to Liberate Jerusalem in the Late Middle Ages


Madden, Thomas F., The Catholic Historical Review


Raising Arms: Liturgy in the Struggle to Liberate Jerusalem in the Late Middle Ages. By Amnon Linder. [Cultural Encounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, Volume 2.] (Turnhout: Brepols. 2003. Pp. xx, 423. $ 113.00, euro90,00.)

In the renaissance that is now crusade studies, scholars have increasingly turned their attention to the wider implications and expressions of the movement. Once relegated to the periphery of medieval history, new studies have demonstrated that the crusades existed at its very core, animating events and dynamics across Europe. Modern studies no longer view the crusades as mere military campaigns, but as intensely religious activities incomprehensible outside of religious history. The crusades were the barometer of Europe's soul. For medieval Christians, success in the crusades meant spiritual health and the favor of God. Defeat, which was the norm, was clear evidence of a sickness in Christendom and general divine disfavor. That is why "home front" crusade activities, such as prayers, processions, and fasts were seen as integral to success as the mustering of troops and the fighting of wars.

It is all the more surprising then, that virtually no scholarly attention has been paid to the ways in which medieval Christians sought to win victories abroad through prayers at home. In that respect, this book is the first spade full of dirt in what promises to be a large and fascinating excavation. It is the first study to gather together and examine crusade-related prayers within medieval liturgy. Specifically, Linder looks at five kinds of liturgical prayers: the Holy Land Clamor, a genre of prayer that appears after the conquest of Jerusalem in 1187 that was usually injected into the Mass or the Office; the Holy Land Mass, identified by distinctive prayers in the Collect, secret, and Postcommunion; the dedicated war Mass, which weaves together the triple prayers along with additional supplications and appropriate Scriptural readings; the GregorianTrental, a series of Masses-usually thirty as the name suggests-for the deliverance of Christians or Christian lands held in bondage or (as was much more often the case) the deliverance of souls from Purgatory; and the Holy Land bidding prayers, which were vernacular petitions read at Mass.

Perhaps it is due to the ground-breaking nature of this book, but the organization is unlike anything I have encountered before. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Raising Arms: Liturgy in the Struggle to Liberate Jerusalem in the Late Middle Ages
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.