Letters


Trouble in paradise

Ken Brociner writes in his article, "The Left's Identity Crisis," that "[Jerome Armstrong and I] vociferously denounce the Democratic Leadership Council (DLC) for being too timid and centrist. Yet at the same time, they suggest that a return to the good old days of the DLC-aligned Clinton administration would be close to political paradise."

I'd love to see a quote in the book where we advocate a return of the Clinton administration, because, quite frankly, none exists. Heck, throw in the over 4 million words I've written the past five years on Daily Kos and other media venues (plus however many Armstrong has written) and still, such a quote (or the words "political paradise" for that matter) does not exist.

Markos Moulitsas

Publisher Daily Kos

KEN BROCINER RESPONDS

Who authors choose to write the Foreword to their book is an important statement in and of itself. In the case of Crashing the Gate, Moulitsas and Armstrong chose Simon Rosenberg, a political centrist whose enthusiasm for the Clinton administration seems to be boundless. In his Foreword, Rosenberg proclaimed that during the Clinton era, "Democrats demonstrated the power of effective, progressive governance. It is a record to be proud of?"

At no point in the 182 pages of text that followed did Moulitsas or Armstrong, in any way, distance themselves from Rosenberg or from what he had to say about the Clinton administration.

Clearly, activists who hold such views are currently playing a critical role in the center-left, anti-Bush coalition that has formed in recent years. But when they declare themselves and/or their blogs (as Moulitsas and Armstrong have) to be at the cutting edge of "a new progressive movement," they are not only adding to what I have called the "left's identity crisis," but, more importanty, are so diluting the actualcontent of the term "progressive" that it may come to represent nothing more than a mildly reformist approach to politics, rather than one that stresses the need for urgent and systematic change.

Bummed out

In October 2007's AppalO-Meter, the description in the entry "Cripes, What a Race!" Dave Mulcahey referred to two men murdered by white supremacists as "unfortunate bums."

Isn't there a less pejorative word? Destitutes? Homeless alcoholics?

"Bum" makes me think that Mulcahey doesn't get out there among "them" enough. …

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