The Tyrrell/McAuliffe Letters

The American Spectator, December/January 2007 | Go to article overview

The Tyrrell/McAuliffe Letters


EVER ON THE LOOKOUT FOR CURRENT WISDOM, I, this past summer, secreted a copy of Terry McAuliffe's memoir: What A Party!: My Life Among Democrats: Presidents, Candidates, Donors, Activists, Alligators, and Other Wild Animals, into the reading room of Gold's Gym in Naples, Florida, with the hope of coming across an entry suitable for presentation in this famed department of AmSpec. The memoirist did not disappoint. On page 58 he wrote that in past issues this magazine of the Arts published articles "alleging" that Boy Clinton "ordered the murder of political opponents...." I entered the entire paragraph in our May issue, as you will doubtless recall.

Moreover on May 10 I sent Mr. McAuliffe a letter of inquiry that elicited the following delightful correspondence, demonstrating as it does that Bill Clinton is not the only Clintonista who inveterately lies and dissembles even when the DNA is against him. -RET

May 10, 2007

Dear Mr. McAuliffe:

In your memoir you state that we published articles "alleging that [Clinton] ordered the murder of political opponents...." I have not been able to find such articles. Could you give me the citations?

Cordially,

R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr.

Editor in Chief

No Response From McAuliffe

Purely by chance, I encountered Mr. McAuliffe in the Green Room of MSNBC while he was joshing with a comely makeup woman. Gingerly I reminded him of my May 10 inquiry, leavening any possible tension by imparting to him a hilarious exchange between Lady Duff Cooper and Charles de Gaulle in the late 1940s. A little name dropping never hurts with a boulevardier like McAuliffe, and though I doubt he recognized Lady Cooper, I am almost certain he was familiar with de Gaulle's name. At any rate, he promised to get back to me after consulting with his "writer." I followed up with the following:

July 3, 2007

Dear Mr. McAuliffe:

How very pleasant visiting with you in the Green Room. I hope you will not forget General de Gaulle's drollery.

I attach a copy of my original letter to you. I fear your "writer" has misled you. You'll note what I have questioned you about is a direct quotation. You might ask the "writer" to provide the article or articles he is referring to.

All good wishes,

R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr.

Editor in Chief

July 11, 2007

Dear Mr. Tyrrell:

It was good to see you recently in the MSNBC green room. I'm sure we'll be seeing much more of each other in the coming months. I wanted to thank you for your interest in my book, "What A Party." I'm delighted that it has done so well and sparked many conversations.

I thought I should mention that in your letters from May 10 and July 3, 2007, you appear to have erroneously quoted a passage from my book. Here's the exact and only passage in reference to the American Spectator and it is from page 58: "...something called The American Spectator, which took under-the-table money from an ultraconservative named Richard Mellon Scaife and used it to send reporters out to do just enough digging to give the veneer of truth to wild, unfounded charges."

And that should answer your question.

Sincerely,

Terry McAuliffe

August 17, 2007

Dear Terry McAuliffe:

Thank you for your good letter of July 11, which arrived while I was visiting the handball alleys in the west of Ireland. The present American national champion is Irish and the game has deep roots there.

Contrary to your July 11 letter, I did not "erroneously" quote your reference to The American Spectator on page 58 of your book. …

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