The Point Is to Change It: Poetry and Criticism in the Continuing Present

By Kantor, Jamison | The Virginia Quarterly Review, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

The Point Is to Change It: Poetry and Criticism in the Continuing Present


Kantor, Jamison, The Virginia Quarterly Review


UVA FACULTY BOOKS The Point Is To Change It: Poetry and Criticism in the Continuing Present by Jerome McGann. Alabama, April 2007. $60 cloth, $32.95 paper

Jerome McGann had us all going when he proposed an Experiment in Criticism (1972) to investigate the late Victorian aesthetic poet A. C. Swinburne. The book was written in the form of an episodic dialogue, with McGann inhabiting the roles of various authoritative Swinburne critics across the first half of the twentieth century. But like the intensive historicism for which he is now well known, this so-called experimental form actually had a venerable, traditional precedent. McGann's resurrection of the Socratic dialogue, a form more widely used by philosophers, was a generic decision that did much to liberate the critical object from more recent scholarly writing's hermitic seal. We could nearly feel Brooks ousted by Bakhtin, the well-wrought writer laid under the interpretive fields. And, yes, each separate "critic" was still only McGann. But this was more importantly a reinvigorating critical game, and a masque wholly appropriate to a dramatic lyricist like Swinburne. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Point Is to Change It: Poetry and Criticism in the Continuing Present
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.