Carl P. Daw, Jr

By Gray, Nancy Wicklund | The Hymn, Autumn 2007 | Go to article overview

Carl P. Daw, Jr


Gray, Nancy Wicklund, The Hymn


Carl Daw has been honored by The Hymn Society in the United States and Canada at its annual conference in Ottawa from July 15-19 by being designated as a Fellow of the Hymn Society. He was honored, according to David Eicher, President of The Hymn Society, for his immense contributions to the world of congregational song.

Carl Pickens Daw, Jr. was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1944. His father was a Baptist minister. Daw grew up in Newport, Nashville, and Murfreesboro, Tennessee where he studied music throughout his school years. After graduating from Rice University (BA), he attended University of Virginia, earning the MA and PhD. For eight years, Daw taught English at the College of William and Mary, where the courses he developed included one that explored the effect of music on text.1 While he was in seminary at the University of the South, he become involved with hymn editing and writing, serving on the Text Committee of the Standing Commission on Church Music. The Committee was working on the Episcopal Hymnal 1982. Following ordination, Daw was Assistant Rector of Christ and Grace Church in Petersburg, Virginia for three years (1981-84). For nine years he was VicarChaplain of St. Mark's Chapel at the University of Connecticut (1984-1993). He spent three years as a resident Companion of the Community of Celebration in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, and served various interim and supply ministries in that area.2

Carl Daw's hymn texts appear in most denominational and ecumenical hymnals published in North America. They have also been published in collections: A Tear of Grace: Hymns for the Church Tear (1990), To Sing God's Praise: Metrical Canticles (1992), New Psalms and Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1996), Gathered for Worship (2006). …

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