Resources for Jewish Biography and Autobiography on the Internet

By Lerner, Heidi G. | Shofar, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

Resources for Jewish Biography and Autobiography on the Internet


Lerner, Heidi G., Shofar


The Internet and associated digital technologies are useful to Jewish Studies scholars who research, write, and teach Jewish biography and autobiography. Increasing amounts of secondary and primary sources originally preserved in manuscript or print form are now being digitized and made available as electronic resources. A number of newly created databases and web sites provide diverse biographical information. The Internet is also a vehicle for the creation and dissemination of various forms of life writing and self-narrative in textual, visual and audio formats. The incorporation of biography and autobiography into the multidisciplinary field of Jewish Studies is coming of age. This paper looks at the availability of biographical research materials and autobiographical expression on the Internet and helps scholars locate these resources.

(ProQuest: ... denotes non-USASCII text omitted.)

Secondary Sources

Introduction

The Internet and associated digital technologies are useful to Jewish Studies scholars who research, write, and teach Jewish biography and autobiography. Increasing amounts of secondary and primary sources originally preserved in manuscript or print form are now being digitized and made available as electronic resources, in some cases with highly sophisticated search capabilities. A number of newly created databases and web sites provide diverse biographical information. The Internet is also emerging as a vehicle for the creation and dissemination of various forms of life writing and self-narrative in textual, visual and audio formats. The incorporation of biography and autobiography into the multidisciplinary field of Jewish Studies is coming of age. Mara Cohen Ioannides describes her experience teaching a course on Jewish American autobiography at Southwest Missouri State University.1 The Winter 2005 issue of Jewish Quarterly Review was devoted entirely to various aspects of Jewish autobiography. During the past three years, Michael Stanislawski, Jan Schwarz, and Marcus Moseley have written monographs on the genre of Jewish autobiography. Gabriella Safran has reviewed these in Prooftexts.2 This presentation does not attempt to continue or add to their discussion. Rather, the intent is to look at the availability of biographical research materials and autobiographical expression on the Internet and to help scholars locate these resources.

Search Tools

Locating biographical information on the Internet can be time-consuming and overwhelming. A search in a general search engine such as Google or Yahoo on a personal name may retrieve a large number of hits, but there is no guarantee that the information is reliable, current, or accurate. Another common starting point is Wikipedia, which is surprisingly comprehensive, but cannot be 100 percent relied upon because it is not authoritative.3 However, a number of web-based tools exist that can provide scholars with high-quality information. These can be very brief entries with perhaps a date of birth, occupation, address, etc., while others have more in depth, essay-type information.

Biographical Dictionaries, Encyclopedias, Directories

Biographical dictionaries, encyclopedias and directories vary in type and publishing style. Many of these are "dynamic" or "open," which means that editors or the public can edit or update the biographies, or even add new entries. These are constantly changing, and can provide very current information. Others are or contain electronic facsimiles, which are popular because they contain the text and look of the original print publication. However, their appearance on the Internet allows many of these also to receive new or enhanced information.

For many years, World Biographical Index, issued by the prominent German publisher of biographical and other scholarly reference books K. G. Saur, has been one of the best online resources for Jewish Studies scholars in need of retrospective biographical information. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Resources for Jewish Biography and Autobiography on the Internet
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.