Lancelot and the Lord of the Distant Isles, or, the Book of Galehaut Retold

By Hoffman, Donald L. | Arthuriana, October 1, 2007 | Go to article overview

Lancelot and the Lord of the Distant Isles, or, the Book of Galehaut Retold


Hoffman, Donald L., Arthuriana


PATRICIA TERRY and SAMUEL N. ROSENBERG with wood engravings by judith jaidinger, Lancelot and the Lord of the Distant Isles, or, The Book of Galehaut Retold. Jaffrey, NH: Godine, 2006. Pp. xvii, 226. ISBN: 978-1-56792-32-7. $26.95.

This enchanting retelling of tales from the Lancelot en prose follows the tradition of Joseph Bédier's famous and widely popular The Romance of Tristan. Like Bédier, Terry and Rosenberg reshape a medieval text to make it more accessible to a contemporary audience. The problem faced in each case is, however, intriguingly different. Bédier was faced with a number of versions of the prose Tristan, none of which was entirely complete, and few of which entirely agreed with each other. Although Gottfried von Strasbourg and Thomas conveniently fit together with Thomas supplying the conclusion lacking in Gottfried, the Béroul version is considerably different and other anomalous versions record unique variants. Bédier hoped to reconstruct the Archetype from these sometimes disparate materials. Whether one agrees that he has indeed recovered the archetypal version of the Tristan (and I doubt that anyone now does believe it), his narrative has an artistic grace of its own and has delighted and continues to delight readers whether they are or are not Tristan scholars.

Terry and Rosenberg had quite the opposite problem. Their 'archetype' already exists in its entirety, even if not all manuscripts agree, but their project, as the subtitle makes clear, is to reconstruct a somewhat different text by rigorously pruning the original material. Thus, while Bédier was working with a process of accretion, Terry and Rosenberg approach their project by a series of eliminations. In both cases, the aim is to create a coherent, readable text. And in this, both achieve remarkable success. In addition to providing readable redactions, Bédier and Terry-Rosenberg have a clear motivation behind their recensions. For Bédier, the new version is meant to prove his theories of the Archetype; for Terry and Rosenberg, the motive is to extract from the Lancelot the embedded narrative of Galehaut and his tragic love for Lancelot. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lancelot and the Lord of the Distant Isles, or, the Book of Galehaut Retold
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.