"Walking in the Spirit": The Complexity of Belonging in Two Pentecostal Churches in Durban, South Africae

By Anderson, Allan | African Studies Review, December 2007 | Go to article overview

"Walking in the Spirit": The Complexity of Belonging in Two Pentecostal Churches in Durban, South Africae


Anderson, Allan, African Studies Review


Kristina Helgesson. "Walking in the Spirit": The Complexity of Belonging in Two Pentecostal Churches in Durban, South Africa. Dissertationsand Documents in Cultural Anthropology. Uppsala, Sweden: Uppsala University, 2006. 292 pp. Photographs. Maps. Notes. Appendix. Bibliography. No price reported. Paper.

This study, a Ph.D. dissertation in anthropology at the University of Uppsala (Sweden), is a well-written micro-analysis of two congregations of the South African Assemblies of God in Durban. The author demonstrates that the apartheid terminology and segregation in most churches still prevails in these communities: one (Red Hill) is an impoverished "coloured" (mixed race) church, the other (Olive Tree) a relatively rich "white" one. The concept of "belonging" or feeling "at home" forms the central conceptual theme, shaped as it is by the remaining inequalities of post-1994 South African society. "Belonging" empowers both individuals and the communities they belong to. Helgesson's approach, however, is not merely reductionist, for her phenomenological exploration of belonging is based on complex lived experiences of her informants. She shows how the apartheid era has left its pernicious mark on these two congregations, affecting how members relate to the world and the "other" in South African society, and informing their values and opinions.

The thick descriptions of this study provide an intriguing microcosm of white South African society, particularly highlighting the ambiguity present among Anglophone South Africans. The first three chapters deal with method, context, and history, narrating the individual stories of Pentecostal members and their own interpretations of their background, and showing how these personal histories form an essential part of both their present and future trajectories of belonging. The experiences of the past apartheid system and the new democratic order are viewed very differently by the two churches. The coloureds see the past as oppression and the present as liberation, while many whites express feelings of nostalgia for a past better way of life. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

"Walking in the Spirit": The Complexity of Belonging in Two Pentecostal Churches in Durban, South Africae
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.