MODERN HISTORY AND POLITICS: Negotiating for the Past: Archeology, Nationalism, and Diplomacy in the Middle East, 1919-1941

By Jankowski, James | The Middle East Journal, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

MODERN HISTORY AND POLITICS: Negotiating for the Past: Archeology, Nationalism, and Diplomacy in the Middle East, 1919-1941


Jankowski, James, The Middle East Journal


MODERN HISTORY AND POLITICS: Negotiating for the Past: Archeology, Nationalism, and Diplomacy in the Middle East, 1919-1941, by James F. Goode. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2007. xii + 233 pages. Notes to p. 265. Bibl. to p. 208. Index to p. 293. $55 cloth; $22.95 paper.

Reviewed by James Jankowski

Neither the story of Western archeological activity in the Middle East in the interwar period, nor the history of increasingly assertive local nationalist sentiment over the same period, is unexplored territory. This valuable study reexamines both topics on a comparative basis by considering archeology and nationalism, as well as diplomacy as an adjunct to the former, in four Middle Eastern countries (Turkey, Egypt, Iran, and Iraq). The detailed analysis of the often fraught relationship between archeologists and nationalists makes for an original and stimulating read, one with implications beyond the historical era under consideration.

The work is extraordinarily well researched and documented. The documentation is richest on the archeological side. The author has mined, with great effect, the papers of many of the leading Western archeologists of the period as well as the archives of numerous museums, institutes, and universities involved in sponsoring archeological expeditions. While American archeological endeavors receive the greatest attention, the activities of other Western countries and archeologists are also considered. He has also conducted less extensive but nonetheless substantial research in the nationalist press of the four countries involved and in the memoirs of nationalist spokesmen of the period. The result is a comparative study of unusual depth.

The work's central thesis is that, in the contest for the control of both archeological sites and the artifacts discovered therein, the 1920s and 1930s witnessed a process of the assertion of indigenous control of archeological activity and artifacts. Through the establishment and/or strengthening of departments of antiquity, the closing of export loopholes, and the closer supervision of archeological projects, the indigenous domination of the handling of their national heritages being demanded by nationalist spokesmen and movements in Turkey, Egypt, Iran, and Iraq was gradually achieved. The process was neither an uncontested nor a totally successful one; often aided by their diplomatic representatives, Western archeologists and institutions operating in the Middle East offered persistent and sometimes effective resistance to the restriction of their freedom of operation and export. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

MODERN HISTORY AND POLITICS: Negotiating for the Past: Archeology, Nationalism, and Diplomacy in the Middle East, 1919-1941
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.