Preparing for Graduate Study in Psychology: 101 Questions and Answers

By Floresco, Stan | Canadian Psychology, November 2007 | Go to article overview

Preparing for Graduate Study in Psychology: 101 Questions and Answers


Floresco, Stan, Canadian Psychology


WILLIAM BUSKIST and CAROLINE BURKE Preparing for Graduate Study in Psychology: 101 Questions and Answers Blackwell Publishing, 2006, 120 pages (ISBN: 9781405140522, $19.95 Paperback)

Reviewed by STAN FLORESCO

In their book, Drs. Buskist and Burke lay out a wellorganized and systematic series of commonly asked questions and answers regarding how undergraduate students should prepare for applying to and succeeding in graduate school in psychology. The book is broken down into a number of chapters organized in a chronological manner, starting with the fundamentals of what graduate school is like and how to choose a specific program. It then proceeds to more specific pieces of information, including the GRE, details on the application and interview process, and finishes with a timeframe on how to organize one's first year of graduate studies. Each of these chapters is formatted as a series of key questions, followed by detailed answers related to the overall theme of the section. Also included in this edition are very useful appendices that include a glossary of terms, a sample vitae, and letters of intent.

This was an extremely easy book to read, and I am confident that it would be an invaluable tool for the aspiring graduate student. I would certainly recommend it to any student who asked me about graduate school and the application process. Indeed, some of the information would also benefit junior faculty mentors looking to take on graduate students for the first time, as it gives examples of important questions that one might ask a potential student.

A key strength of this work is that it details to the potential student the differences between undergraduate and graduate studies. Many undergraduates are overwhelmed by the radical changes that take place in graduate school life, but the information provided in this book would make the transition between undergraduate and graduate programs much smoother. It places a heavy emphasis on the student being well rounded, highlighting that extracurricular research experience may play an equally important, if not more important, role in getting accepted into a program, compared to GPA and GRE scores. Also included are helpful tidbits such as how much it costs to apply to graduate schools, what kinds of questions to ask during the interview, and what to do if one does not get accepted into the program of his or her choosing.

The last chapter, entided "The First Year: Thriving, Surviving and Other Essentials," tackles issues related to how to decide on a graduate mentor, when to choose a thesis committee, switching programs during graduate school, and most intriguingly, how to not "wash out" of the program. This chapter alone would be a useful reference for any mentor to give to an incoming first-year graduate student.

Probably the single most useful aspect of the book is in the Appendix, which describes in detail what a student should be doing to maximize the chances of getting into a graduate program in psychology, starting from the first year through to his or her senior year of studies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Preparing for Graduate Study in Psychology: 101 Questions and Answers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.