Back in Action: An American Soldier's Story of Courage, Faith, and Fortitude

By Atkeson, Edward B. | Army, December 2007 | Go to article overview

Back in Action: An American Soldier's Story of Courage, Faith, and Fortitude


Atkeson, Edward B., Army


Back in Action: An American Soldier's Story of Courage, Faith, and Fortitude. Capt. David Rozelle. Regnery Publishing Inc. 230 pages; color photographs; $27.95.

Back in Action: An American Soldier's Story of Courage, Faith, and Fortitude is the self-told story of a young American Army officer, Capt. David Rozelle, given command of an armored cavalry troop in Iraq. There he suffered the loss of a foot, and multiple lesser wounds, to an enemy road mine, and was shipped home via the Landstuhl (Germany) and Walter Reed (Washington, D.C.) U.S. military hospitals. At these staging points, his days were spent in pain, in drugged partial consciousness and in a continuing effort to recover the use of his body through determined physical exercise. He underwent three surgical procedures at Walter Reed alone, but he gives "total credit" for the better part of his recovery to his routine of physical therapy.

Capt. Rozelle returned to his regiment's home base in Colorado just in time to witness the birth of his son. He then was obliged to summon up his determination to overcome the effects of painkilling-but habit-forming drugs. Again he found physical exercise, urged on by knowledgeable friends, to be his best path to anything close to normalcy. His body weight had dropped 45 pounds since the bombing. His prosthetist, one Chris Jones, soon had him jumping, walking and performing push-ups, as he accommodated himself to his device.

No less important was his discovery of the Disabled Sports USA organization on the Internet. …

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