Admission Policies and the Quality of University Education in Nigeria

By Okoroma, N. S. | Educational Research Quarterly, March 2008 | Go to article overview

Admission Policies and the Quality of University Education in Nigeria


Okoroma, N. S., Educational Research Quarterly


The population of Nigeria is 140 million according to the last 2006 census. Only 75 Universities are available to cater to this population with one University for 1,866,000 people. The inability of the available Universities in Nigeria to cope with the high demand for University education has put much pressure on University admissions. In order to satisfy some interests the Government of Nigeria adopted such admission policies as the quota system, catchment areas, backwardness factor, and discriminatory fees. Following the observed fall in the standards of University education in Nigeria it is speculated that the admission policies are responsible for the situation. To confirm this an opinion survey involving 384 respondents sampled from eight (8) Universities in the South-South zone of Nigeria was conducted. An instrument known as 'Admission Policies and Effect on University Education Quality (APEUEQ)' was used for gathering data after validation. The correlation coefficient reliability of the instrument was found to be 0.73. The chi-square data analysis method was applied. The finding showed that all the parameters of interest have contributed to the reduction of the quality of University education in Nigeria. The paper recommended a complete review of the admission policies and the establishment of more universities to meet the increasing demand for university education.

Introduction

Nigerian youths, in particular, and the adult population in general, attach much premium on University education. Most people in Nigeria who have the potential for University education show desperation in their efforts to gain admissions into the highly limited available spaces. This obsession and preference for University education as against other forms of higher education such as Colleges of Education, Polytechnics and Monotechnics which also offer degree programmes has placed enormous pressure on the placement and management of Universities in Nigeria. Consequently, standards are often negatively affected.

No law in Nigeria makes university education compulsory. The National Policy on Education (2004, p. 36) lists the goals of tertiary education which includes University education thus: To,

(a) Contribute to national development through high level relevant manpower training;

(b) Develop and inculcate proper values for the survival of the individual and society.

(c) Develop the intellectual capability of individuals to understand and appreciate their local and external environments;

(d) Acquire both physical and intellectual skills which will enable individuals to be self-reliant and useful members of the society.

(e) Promote and encourage scholarship and community service

(f) Forge and cement national unity; and

(g) Promote national and international understanding and interaction.

The National Policy on Education (1981, p. 22) specifically states that the above goals will be pursued by the Universities through:

(i) Teaching;

(ii) Research;

(iii) The dissemination of existing and new information;

(iv) The pursuit of service to the community; and

(v) Be a storehouse of knowledge.

Ajayi (1988) and Wokocha and Okujagu (1999) have respectively tried to place Universities above other tertiary institutions. However, such views do not provide reasons for the preference of University education by many Nigerians to other tertiary institutions. In the view of Ajayi (1988):

A University is a storehouse of retrievable knowledge and has functions which include authorship and publication of standard texts, self-sustenance, creation of a model community in efficiency, probity and tolerance, honest and enlightened commentary on public affairs in order to impartially educate and to inform.

In their own view about a University, Wokocha and Okujagu ( 1999, p. 120) state thus:

A University is different from other academic institutions because its preoccupation is not only in the diffusion of knowledge but in its extension. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Admission Policies and the Quality of University Education in Nigeria
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.