Career and Training in the New Economy: A Study Focused to Small Scale Enterprises Located in OSTIM Organized Industrial Region in Ankara/Turkey

By Aksoy, Hasan Huseyin | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, September 2007 | Go to article overview

Career and Training in the New Economy: A Study Focused to Small Scale Enterprises Located in OSTIM Organized Industrial Region in Ankara/Turkey


Aksoy, Hasan Huseyin, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore and describe training levels related to careers, employment, and influences of "new economy" in small and mid-sized firms. The organizational side of career development behaviors was also a focus of this study. Interviews related to company policies and practices were conducted with 26 employers or managers of small and mid-sized firms located in the OSTIM Organized Industrial Region in Ankara, Turkey. This research found it is rare in small and mid-size companies to offer structured workplace training or career development activities for workers. Managers had more interest in workplace training if their companies were required to have quality assurance certifications, or if the company participated in exporting, was involved in customs procedures, or was in a business that required foreign language skills. Managers indicated very low interest in training related to social, cultural, personal development, and esthetical issues.

Key Words

New Economy, Career Development, Career Planning, On-the-Job Training, Workplace Learning, Small Business.

There is increasing concern among individuals whose working life demands more flexibility, yet is less secure and less guaranteed as a result of the economic and social changes tied to globalization (Sennett, 1998/2002). Individuals who are preparing for careers or who are new in the workplace want to control their own career path-a natural and proper motivation. But the new global economy is transforming the world of work into a place of fast-paced changes and worker obscurity for many workers or job seekers. Companies that restructure and re-size damage workers' and job seekers' trust in both the companies and the underlying political structure. Such concerns are far from groundless-the rates of unemployment in many countries, including Turkey, where this research was conducted, show that unemployment is a continuing, significant problem for both developed and less developed economies (Kok, 2003, pp.12-13; ILO, 2006). Other concerns for prospective employees are low wages, job security, barriers to professional development, and lack of career advancement opportunities. Some companies tout the concept of developing a career path, but because of many other issues, functionally ignore career growth altogether, thus stifling the vocational development of individual workers.

The "career" concept is not specific to a profession or a job or a stage in a profession or a job. "Career" refers to accomplishments, skills, and responsibilities a person accumulates during his/her working life. In general, career development and advancement are accepted steps for an individual who is advancing upwardly through an organizational hierarchy. A broader view of the career concept suggests that a career can also include the individual's attitude and experience. For example, if an employee develops new skills, even if he/she stays in same position hierarchically, he/she could consider this a successful career. Similarly, if an employee works in different roles within one or more companies and has extensive or comprehensive experience, this, too, can be termed a successful career (Cummings & Worley, 1997, p. 402). Now, however, the new economic order is blocking such employee development in the context of a life-long career. Today, the global job market is increasingly defined through flexible jobs and flexible employment (e.g., the expansion of part-time positions, employment in informal sectors, temporary contract-based employment, payment on a per-job basis, and subcontractors who work for companies as a kind of selfemployment) throughout an individual's entire working life (Sennett, 1998/2002, pp. 9-10).

Many companies or organizations view career planning as closely tied to the nature and activities of the company's business. Employees, on the other hand, want to get involved with their individual career planning, which includes self evaluation and their relationships to job skills and workplace conditions, especially focusing on how career development could affect their future in their job or profession (Griffin, 1993). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Career and Training in the New Economy: A Study Focused to Small Scale Enterprises Located in OSTIM Organized Industrial Region in Ankara/Turkey
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.