Citizens or Papists? the Politics of Anti-Catholicism in New York, 1685-1821

By Shelley, Thomas J. | The Catholic Historical Review, January 2008 | Go to article overview

Citizens or Papists? the Politics of Anti-Catholicism in New York, 1685-1821


Shelley, Thomas J., The Catholic Historical Review


Citizens or Papists? The Politics of Anti-Catholicism in New York, 1685-1821. By Jason K. Duncan. [Hudson Valley Heritage Series, 3.] (New York: Fordham University Press. 2005. Pp. xviii, 253. $70.00.)

Jason Duncan analyzes the political fortunes of New York Catholics from the anti-Catholic populist regime that came to power in the colony in 1689 after the downfall of James II to the state constitutional convention of 1821, which finally accorded Catholics full civil rights. From the beginning of the eighteenth century to the year after the British evacuation of New York City in November 1783 Catholic priests were legally barred from entering the colony under penalty of life imprisonment.

During the Revolution anti-Catholic sentiment among the Patriots gradually subsided in New York as elsewhere in the colonies. Loyalists, more numerous in New York than anywhere else, taunted Patriots for their connivance with popery. As early as 1777 the first state constitution guaranteed religious freedom to all, including Catholics. However, supplementary legislation limited the practical consequences of this declaration by requiring office holders to renounce their allegiance to all foreign jurisdiction "ecclesiastical as well as civil" and prescribing the same religious test for immigrants seeking citizenship. In Duncan's words, "[I]t was convenient ... to grant religious liberty to Catholics in the abstract and then to erect legal barriers to discourage them from entering the state and deny full citizenship to those already there" (p. 42).

The restrictive state naturalization law lapsed with the adoption of the federal constitution. After a protest signed by 1,300 New York Catholics, the religious test for office holders was repealed in 1806, allowing a Catholic, Francis Cooper, to take his seat in the state Assembly. That same year the state legislature voted to give St. Peter's Church in New York City the same subsidy for its parochial school as was granted to Protestant schools. During the War of 1812 the state legislature repealed the law that gave election inspectors the right to require voters to renounce foreign ecclesiastical jurisdiction. The offensive law was not included in the new state constitution adopted in 1821.

Duncan demolishes the myth that colonial New York was a model of religious toleration by documenting that Catholics were excluded from its benefits after 1689. …

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