The Impact of Art, Design and Environment in Mental Healthcare: A Systematic Review of the Literature

By Daykin, Norma; Byrne, Ellie et al. | The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, March 2008 | Go to article overview

The Impact of Art, Design and Environment in Mental Healthcare: A Systematic Review of the Literature


Daykin, Norma, Byrne, Ellie, Soteriou, Tony, O'Connor, Susan, The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health


Abstract

Aims: There has been a burgeoning interest in arts and the environment in healthcare. While research has been undertaken on the clinical impact of disciplines, relatively little research has studied the impact of broader arts for health interventions. This paper reports findings from a systematic review of the arts for health literature, encompassing research on the impact of visual art, design and the environment on the well-being of patients and staff in mental healthcare settings.

Methods: A systematic review of over 600 papers published between 1985 and 2005 on the impact of arts, design and environments in mental healthcare was undertaken. The review includes a discussion of contextual and policy literature, as well as 19 reports of quantitative and qualitative studies that met our inclusion criteria.

Results: The largest number of studies focused on the aspects of art, design and environment that were relevant to mental healthcare. These studies suggest that this can affect health, including physiological, psychological, clinical and behavioural effects. Exposure to stressful visual and aural environments may reduce levels of stress and enhance recovery. Architectural design consideration is important in mental health settings, especially for patients with conditions such as dementia that can make wayfinding difficult. Exposure to art in healthcare environments has been found to reduce anxiety and depression. Environment features have also been found to affect staff, and improvements in visual and acoustic conditions may reduce risks of errors in some care settings. Qualitative studies provide insights into factors affecting the impact of arts, including issues of power and control, perceptions and influence of key stakeholders, and user participation. A key issue to emerge from this study is that arts interventions do not necessarily address the lack of control exercised by patients in healthcare environments.

Conclusions: While there is extensive literature on the impact of design, environment and the arts on health, there is still a need for further research that addresses methodological challenges of evaluating complex interventions. Our review found evidence that environmental enhancements can have a positive impact on health and well-being of staff and patients in mental healthcare. Arts, when considered within this framework of evidence-based design, can also contribute to well-being, offering reassurance and creating identity in healthcare settings. Further research is needed in this area, as well as research that explores the contribution of other models of art that do not fit within the framework of 'evidence-based design'. Finally, responses to the arts are contingent on a number of complex social and political factors; further understanding of these is needed in order to inform future research and evaluation of the arts in healthcare.

Key words

arts; design; environment; mental health; systematic review

BACKGROUND

Arts have been utilised in a number of ways in mental health settings. Art therapy is an established discipline in mental healthcare, used with a number of client groups.1'2'3,4,5 Art is also used as a diagnostic tool in conditions such as depression6,7 and in the field of substance abuse.8,9

These activities exist within the expanding domain of'arts for health', a broad movement that encompasses a wide range of disciplines and practices, from art therapy through to public art and architecture. Since the early 1980s, the contribution of design, environment and arts to clinical and non-clinical outcomes in health has been recognized. While research in this field is less developed than in other areas, such as art therapy, there is increasing evidence that attractive environments can enhance the experiences of healthcare service users.10,11,12,13,14,15

The socio-economic and policy contexts of different countries have influenced approaches to the arts in healthcare. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Impact of Art, Design and Environment in Mental Healthcare: A Systematic Review of the Literature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.