Coordinating Community Responses to Domestic Violence: Lessons from Duluth and Beyond

By Weisz, Arlene N. PhD, Msw | Violence and Victims, January 1, 2000 | Go to article overview

Coordinating Community Responses to Domestic Violence: Lessons from Duluth and Beyond


Weisz, Arlene N. PhD, Msw, Violence and Victims


Coordinating Community Responses to Domestic Violence: Lessons From Duluth and Beyond Melanie F. Shepard, & Ellen L. Pence, (1999) (Eds.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Hardcover: $54; Softcover: $24.95; 296 pages.

Throughout the United States and in several other countries, communities are attempting to develop coordinated community responses to domestic violence. However, there are few published research studies about these approaches, and there is very little literature describing how coordinated community approaches function and grow. Shepard and Pence are ideally suited to document the history, growth, and influence of the Duluth model, which has had a strong influence on other coordinated community responses that followed it. Their book primarily addresses practitioners who seek to improve responses to domestic violence in their communities. However, it is also very useful for researchers, who should understand the history, context, and practitioners' perspectives on coordinated community responses to domestic violence.

This book performs an important service in its honest and detailed description of the process of developing and continually reforming Duluth's coordinated community response. Nationally, coordinated community responses are so new that this book is probably the first to discuss the practical and philosophical aspects of implementation. Essential chapters by the editors and other leaders from Duluth's coordinated response are augmented by chapters by leaders of community responses in other parts of the U.S. and the British Commonwealth.

The first part of the book contains chapters on the history and philosophy of Duluth's coordinated community response as well as detailed descriptions of how policies, protocols, and monitoring systems were developed. These chapters are full of information that other communities can use to develop or improve their protocols. There are chapters on program evaluation, advocacy, batterer intervention, and child visitation centers.

The second part of the book addresses important aspects of future adaptations of the Duluth model. It has thoughtful chapters discussing women charged with domestic violence, marital rape, and applications of the Duluth model in New Zealand, Britain, and Australia.

Many communities are now implementing approaches that they call "coordinated community responses." Therefore, it is very important that the authors of this book make a distinction between groups that meet periodically to discuss community responses to domestic violence and those that are truly focused on a coordinated plan. They stress that victim advocates oversee the Duluth model with a continual focus on victim safety, offender accountability, and raising community awareness. The book illustrates how much intensive work is need to truly coordinate the disparate efforts of advocates, police, prosecutors, probation departments, and others.

The book is consistently honest about the lack of easy answers when victim safety is the primary concern. Quotes from advocates enliven portions of the book and remind us that real people are involved in these protocols. This honesty makes the book more useful for practitioners than a book that claims to have all the answers. An all-knowing book might make many communities feel they could never emulate Duluth's success. In truth, few communities will have the dedication and high levels of trust needed for all of the participants to open their procedures to the scrutiny of others. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Coordinating Community Responses to Domestic Violence: Lessons from Duluth and Beyond
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.