Charleston Reborn: A Southern City, Its Navy Yard, and World War II

By Sinclair, Dean | South Carolina Historical Magazine, July 2007 | Go to article overview

Charleston Reborn: A Southern City, Its Navy Yard, and World War II


Sinclair, Dean, South Carolina Historical Magazine


Charleston Reborn: A Southern City, Its Navy Yard, and World War II. By Fritz P. Hamer. (Charleston, S.C.: History Press, 2005. Pp. 189; $24.99, paper.)

The story of the Charleston Navy Yard has been told in brief before, but Fritz Hamer fleshes out the evolution of the South Carolina lowcountry's most important military facility, placing it in a larger context and associating it with the revival of Charleston during a critical period in the city's life. Hamer has written more of a social than a chronological history, eschewing the dates of ship launchings and refittings in favor of the effects that this huge federal investment had on nearly every thread of the fabric of life in the Charleston area. Hamer has tapped a variety of sources, including government documents, oral histories, evocative photographs, and maps of the Navy Yard to paint a portrait of a vital United States government facility that had a global, as well as a local, impact.

The Charleston Navy Yard has become indelibly linked with World War II and the homefront efforts of what is often called the "Greatest Generation." However, Hamer quite properly begins his book at the beginning, with the move of the Navy Yard from Port Royal to Charleston in 1901. Yet he is eager to get to his story and passes a little too quickly over the turn-of-the-century local and national political machinations that occurred in order to secure the facility for Charleston. The author is quite correct in his assessment, however, that the Navy Yard had little long-term effect on the lowcountry economy from its establishment until the eve of World War II, despite the fervent hopes of Charleston's leaders who brought the yard to the Cooper River.

Hamer's emphasis throughout is on the many and varied effects of this federal facility on the local economy and society. Following an introductory chapter that sets the stage for the coming of the war that would so dramatically transform the Navy Yard, the author deals with the socio-economic changes wrought by the rapidly expanding facility. In successive chapters, Hamer focuses on the influx of outsiders into the lowcountry; the Navy Yard's effects on labor, gender, and race relations in the city of Charleston; and the challenges faced by the local government to house, feed, and provide social and recreational opportunities for the new arrivals. In a brief epilogue, the author recounts the postwar downsizing of the yard, its resurgence with the coming of the Cold War, and the eventual shut down of the sprawling facility as the Cold War came to an end in the early 1990s. The author does an excellent job providing hard historical facts associated with the expansion of the Navy Yard and its growing influence on the South Carolina lowcountry, while at the same time providing vivid portraits of individuals working at the facility, living in the crowded government-built housing, and riding the buses to downtown Charleston for shopping and recreation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Charleston Reborn: A Southern City, Its Navy Yard, and World War II
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.