Assessment of Sexual Offenders against Children. the APSAC Study Guides 1

By Laws, D. Richard PhD | Violence and Victims, January 1, 1997 | Go to article overview

Assessment of Sexual Offenders against Children. the APSAC Study Guides 1


Laws, D. Richard PhD, Violence and Victims


Assessment of Sexual Offenders Against Children. The APSAC Study Guides 1. Vernon L. Quinsey and Martin L. Lalumiere. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1996. Softcover: $95.00; 98 pages.

It was not so long ago that the skills necessary to perform forensic assessments were learned on the job, not in graduate programs. Today, there are forensic tracks in some graduate programs in clinical psychology and there are a few postdoctoral settings in which forensic specialties are taught. Even in these settings it is likely that the student or postdoctoral fellow will learn only the rudiments of general forensic assessment (e.g., mental illness and criminal responsibility, general dangerousness). It is very unlikely in most settings that the student will learn to adequately assess sexual offenders. This slim volume is directed toward teaching the basics of such an assessment. Having said that, I should emphasize that this is not a book that even a professional skilled in general forensic assessment could read and then immediately perform a proper sex offender assessment. It is definitely not a work for an undergraduate or even a first or second year graduate student assistant. This book will give the reader only the big picture of what one of these assessments would look like. However, having acquired the flavor of the assessment procedure, supervised instruction in conducting such an assessment would probably go more smoothly.

Those of us even modestly familiar with the sex offender evaluation and treatment literature know that the available information is so diverse that one could conceivably argue any point and find at least some support for it. What Quinsey and Lalumiere do very nicely is to compile this information and say: On this issue here is what the literature generally reports. This is done repeatedly at strategic points in the narrative. I found this periodic summarizing the greatest value in this book.

I am not aware of any other work on offender assessment of this specific type. Therefore, I believe that it both fits into the aggregate literature in this area as well as offering a unique contribution. I found it to be well-written, fairly easy to read, and reasonably clear in its exposition. However, I am experienced in this business and I understand both the pros and cons of many of the arguments raised. At 63 densely written pages of text, the less experienced reader and surely the casual reader will find it pretty heavy going. I would now like to turn to the specific sections of the work.

The introduction and the following chapter on the characteristics of sex offenders are very good summaries of the available evidence. The brief section on topologies could usefully be omitted. The third chapter on implications for practice is the meat of the book. Here the authors note the importance of an extensive clinical interview that sharply focuses upon sexual behavior, specifically deviant sexual behavior. They describe some psychological tests with which most readers will be unfamiliar. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Assessment of Sexual Offenders against Children. the APSAC Study Guides 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.